Chile: Secrets of State

12 September 2017 — National Security Archive

On 44th Anniversary of Military Coup, Archive Posts 9/11/1973 Documents

Special Exhibit of Declassified Documents, Curated by The National Security Archive, Opens in Santiago Musuem of Memory and Human Rights

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 603

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Washington D.C. – September 11, 2017 – Forty-four years after the U.S. supported military coup, the Santiago Museum of Memory and Human Rights has inaugurated a special exhibit of declassified CIA, FBI, Defense Department and White house records on the U.S. role in Chile and the Pinochet dictatorship. The unusual exhibit, which officially opened to the public on September 5, is titled Secretos de Estado: La Historia Desclasificada de la Dictadura Chilena—Secrets of State: the Declassified History of the Chilean Dictatorship.

Curated by National Security Archive senior analyst Peter Kornbluh, the exhibit consists of 45 formerly classified documents dated between 1970 when Richard Nixon ordered to the CIA to instigate a coup in Chile, and October 1988 when General Augusto Pinochet sought to orchestrate a second coup after losing a plebiscite to stay in power.

“These documents belong in a museum,” noted Kornbluh who directs the Chile Documentation Project at the National Security Archive and is the author of The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability. “They have generated news headlines; they have been used as evidence in human rights crimes; and now they can provide the powerful verdict of history.”

The exhibit, mounted in the museum’s “Galeria de la Memoria,” will run until March, 2018.

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THE NATIONAL SECURITY ARCHIVE is an independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). A tax-exempt public charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and individuals.