Global Power Project: Exposing the Institute of International Finance, Part 1 By Andrew Gavin Marshall

11 October 2013 — Andrew Gavin MarshallOccupy.com

Global Power Project: Exposing the Institute of International Finance, Part 1

This is the first of a series of exposés focusing on the Institute of International Finance (IIF), the very “visible hand” of financial markets. It is a continuation of the Global Power Project produced by Occupy.com. Part 1 examines the origins of the IIF.

Continue reading this...

A Return to Marx’s Ecological Critique By Simon Butler

9 April 2013 – Green Left Weekly

Karl_Marx_posing1.jpg

Do oil spills make good economic sense? A witness called by Canadian firm Enbridge Inc. – which wants approval to build a $6.5-billion pipeline linking Alberta’s tar sands with the Pacific coast – told a recent hearing in British Columbia (BC) that the answer is yes. He said oil spills could benefit the economy, giving business new opportunities to make money cleaning it up. He told Fishers Union representatives that an oil spill in BC might indeed kill the local fishing industry, but their lost income would be replaced by compensation payouts and new career prospects, such as working for oil cleanup crews.

Continue reading this...

Death Of A Hero By David Cromwell

14 January 2013 — Media Lens

The General, The Media Adulation And The Forgotten Victims

One measure of a society’s honesty is what it says about its political and military leaders when they die. Are the deceased leader’s perceived virtues exalted, while any blemishes are airbrushed out of the picture? Recent media coverage following the death of General Norman “Stormin’ ”Schwarzkopf, the Allied military commander during the Persian Gulf War in 1991, is a case in point.

Continue reading this...

Video: The Agueros Archive: Preserving New York’s Latino Heritage

23 August 2012Columbia University New York Stories

 Jack Agüeros is a poet, playwright, short story writer, translator and author of five books. He was an activist in New York’s Latino community in the 1960s and ’70s and director of El Museo del Barrio for close to a decade. Agüeros, who turns 78 on Sept. 2 and suffers from Alzheimer’s disease, can no longer write. But he will continue to inspire students, writers and literary scholars through the collection of papers, videos and photographs he and his three children, Kadi, Marcel and Natalia, are donating to the Columbia Libraries. Continue reading this...

Papers of Jack Agüeros, Puerto Rican Poet, Bound for Columbia U

3 September 2012

Here’s another story on Jack Agüeros, this is about his library of papers being accepted by Columbia University (PDF).

In 1996, Jack Agüeros, a Puerto Rican author and advocate who wrote sonnets about poor immigrants and Latino street life, would have seemed an unlikely candidate for inclusion in the library of New York City’s most prestigious university.

Jack agueros

Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Jack Agüeros in his office in Lower Manhattan in June 1968 during a hunger strike he staged after he was dismissed by Mayor John V. Lindsay. Mr. Agüeros was demanding, among other things, that more Puerto Ricans be hired by the Lindsay administration.

See also: Slowly, Alzheimer’s Erases a Poet’s Gifts and Memories By Almudena Toral

Columbia’s Quest for Peace & Justice: The International & National Contexts By Professor James Petras

29 February 2012Boiling Frogs

A Step toward Greater Independence

Introduction: Between April 21-23, thousands of activists from most of the major urban and rural social movements and trade unions, human rights groups and indigenous, afro-Colombian movements will meet to unify forces and launch, what promises to be the most significant new political movement in recent history.

Continue reading this...

Imperialism, despotism, and democracy in Syria By Joseph Massad

6 February 2012 — MCW

democracy in SyriaIn the context of the US invasion of the Gulf in 1991, British academic Fred Halliday announced his new right-wing affiliations in the British newspaper the New Statesman by declaring: “If I have to choose between imperialism and fascism, I choose imperialism.” It never occurred to Halliday that he could have opposed both and supported home-grown democratic struggles instead.

Continue reading this...

Category: Syria | No Comments »

#OWS and the Young Trade Unionists by Mark Nowak

22 November 2011 — MRZine

Cory McCray and George Hendricks
Cory McCray, Founder of the Young Trade Unionists, and George Hendricks, Baltimore Teachers Union (BTU) Rep and Vice President of the Young Trade Unionists (YTU)

If you head down to the IBEW Local 24 Union Hall Auditorium on W. Patapsco Avenue in Baltimore on the first Tuesday of any month, you’ll encounter a meeting of an energetic group of young union members from the Metro Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.  The Young Trade Unionists (YTU) was founded in November 2009 by Cory McCray, a graduate of both the Baltimore City Public School System and the five-year apprenticeship program of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers.  Participants in the YTU include young workers from the IBEW, UFCW, teachers’ unions, building trades, public employees’ and other sectors.

Continue reading this...

How Has Murdoch Improved With Age? By Russ Baker

15 July 2011 — WhoWhatWhy – From the Columbia Journalism Review, May/June 1998

ARTICLE SUMMARY:
Here’s an old article that WhoWhatWhy editor Russ Baker wrote about Rupert Murdoch, the media titan whose News Corp is currently the focus of so much controversy. This ran in the Columbia Journalism Review in 1998. But it is useful for comparing the company’s (non-hacking) practices, then and now.

Continue reading this...

Category: Media | No Comments »

Bageant’s Frustration: Extreme Isolation By Morris Berman

21 May 2011 — Joe Bageant - Morris Berman

rainbow pie Given how much we had in common, it’s perhaps a bit odd that Joe Bageant (1946-2011) and I never met (although I think we did correspond at one point). He even wound up living in Mexico a good part of the time. But the real connection between us is the congruence of perception regarding the United States. Joe came from unlikely roots to have formulated the political viewpoint that he did: working-class, right-wing, anti-intellectual, flag-waving, small-town Virginia. A “leftneck,” someone dubbed him; it’s not a bad description.

Continue reading this...