On Marx on Value, Fixed Capital, and the Rate of Profit By S. Artesian

23 April 2014 — The Wolf Report

You know, I hate citing texts.  Kind of like I hate repeating myself.  If the analysis has validity, then we can find, examine, and display that validity in the concrete– that is to say not just in history, but in immediate, concentrated history, which is, and is all, that economics  will ever be until that glorious day when it, economics, is abolished; we can find, examine, and display that validity in the real relations between classes; in the specific, and specificity of the, conditions of labour which is all that history has been; and all an economy and its “laws of motion” ever was.But every once in awhile, I think, “Wait a minute……I have notebooks filled with comments of my own on paragraphs and pages Marx wrote and what X or Y or Z or a H or a P or Maoist ABC, or Leninist XYZ says Marx says is not at all what Marx said.”

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“The struggle to tell the truth through stories”: An interview with British film and television producer Tony Garnett—Part 1

23 October 2013 — WSWS

Part 2 Here

In a retrospective this summer, “Seeing Red,” the British Film Institute (BFI) celebrated the work of veteran film and television producer Tony Garnett. The BFI described Garnett as one of television’s “most influential figures,” who “produced and fostered a succession of provocative, radical and sometimes incendiary dramas.” Continue reading this...

Category: Movies, UK | 1 Comment »

Are we being served? By William Bowles

21 October 2013 – williambowles.info

Central to us on the left is the dilemma of a seemingly indifferent working class to the changes that impact directly not only on our material well-being but on the corporatisation of our cultural lives. Some argue that it’s down to the prevailing sense of powerlessness as the gulf between those who govern and the governed, deepens and widens. But there is perhaps another explanation for our disenfranchisement; the role of the ‘middle class’ as a mechanism of social control.

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Book Review: The talented and reviled Mr Pepper (Comintern agent) By Dan La Botz

20 October 2013 – New Politics

The great European revolutionary epoch of the post war period from the 1910s through the 1920s provides endless biographical material revealing all that is best and worst in the human material of revolution, the Russians having been the most studied, providing shelves of biographies of Lenin, Bukharin, Stalin and Trotsky. Continue reading this...

Climate change: What would Frederick Engels say? By Martin O’Beirne

30 September 2013  – The Ecosocialist

We had not yet destabilised the climate and trounced other planetary ecological boundaries back in 1876 when Frederick Engels wrote these passages in his unfinished The part played by labour in the transition from ape to man. But it is clear that back then Engels had established a biophilous ethic, or in his words: Continue reading this...

The Wolf Report: Capital Volume 1, Chapters 1-5, Really Condensed Version

15 October 2013 — The Wolf Report: confidential Analysis for the anti-investor

Capital Volume 1, Chapters 1-5, Really Condensed Version 

1.  For all the complexity in and of those awe and fear inspiring first chapters of Capital,  Marx really isn’t trying to complicate matters.  He’s engaged in a radical distillation, almost but not quite a simplification,  of the moments of value expression; of the commodity as the condition of social labor.

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The Winter of Content By Carl Rowlands

11 October 2013 – New Left Project

One of the last books that economist and public intellectual JK Galbraith wrote in his long and illustrious career, The Culture of Contentment (1992), has passed into relative obscurity. This is a shame, as it may offer a prophetic glimpse into the long-term, paradoxical consequences of the Reagan-Thatcher era. Capturing the neoliberal tendency at the moment of its consolidation, Galbraith’s essay poses incisive questions for those seeking to understand why, after five years of recession, stagnation and austerity, the structures that produced the 2008 financial crisis are stronger than ever, while popular protest remains sporadic and muted.

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Coordinating collective wage bargaining: a way of transnational solidarity in Europe? By Roland Erne

11 October 2013 — Andreas Bieler

Roland Erne is currently a research fellow at the Centre for Advanced Study in Oslo, where he is part of the project on Globalization and the Possibility of Transnational Actors – The Case of Trade Unions. The purpose of his subproject is to investigate different case studies of translational labour in order to move to a conceptual understanding of the circumstances under which transnational solidarity is possible. In this guest post, he reviews in this respect the book Le salaire, un enjeu pour l’euro-syndicalisme. Histoire de la coordination des négotiations collectives nationales (Presses Universitaires de Nancy, 2011) by Anne Dufresne.

The Norwegian National Election: Europe’s Most Leftist Government Defeated by Right-Wing Coalition By Asbjørn Wahl and Roy Pedersen

22 September 2013 — The Bullet • Socialist Project E-Bulletin No. 883

The red-green coalition government in Norway, whose political platform when it took power in 2005 was called the most progressive in Europe, experienced a bitter defeat in the country’s parliamentary election on 9 September. A coalition of four centre-right and right-wing parties, including a right-wing populist party, gained a solid majority and are now negotiating the political platform for a new government.

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Category: Europe | 1 Comment »

Contested Reproduction and the Contradictions of Socialism By Michael A. Lebowitz

13 September 2013 — The Bullet • Socialist Project E-Bulletin No. 877

Some Explanations About the Fall of ‘Real Socialism’

Why did ‘real socialism’ and, in particular the Soviet Union, fall? Let me note a few explanations that have been offered. With respect to the Soviet Union, one very interesting explanation that has been suggested is that it’s all the fault of Mikhail Gorbachev. And not simply the errors of Gorbachev but the treachery. Those who offer this explanation rely in particular upon a document which is sometimes described as his confession. This document begins as follows:

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Asleep on the job – England’s young doctors and the NHS reforms By Guddi Singh

4 September 2013 — OurNHS

Great tides of people press against me, hands outstretched, faces questioning. They wait for something – a doctor? Anguish ripples through the crowd. Those without the right colour passport are turned away. Countless others shake out their pockets: desperate for pennies; desperate for treatment. Their eyes fill with reproach once they recognize I am a doctor. Their searing gaze brands my guilt.

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Category: Health, UK | No Comments »

London Underground prepares mass closure of ticket offices By James Hatton and Paul Bond

3 September 2013 — WSWS

Recent disclosures have again confirmed London Underground management is planning to close all its 268 ticket offices over the next two years. Around 2,000 jobs are expected to be lost during that period, with job losses across the rail and underground network rising to 6,000 by 2020. The job losses are part of Transport for London (TfL) and London Conservative mayor Boris Johnson’s £7.6 billion cuts programme to the London transport budget.

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