The Ghouta chemical attack: Where are the missing children?

20 September 2013 — Oriental Review

The Ghouta chemical attack: Where are the missing children?

The UN Report published earlier this week on the alleged use of chemical weapons in the Ghouta area of Damascus on Aug. 21, 2013 has clarified many issues but left the key questions unanswered: who committed the attack and who are the victims?

Continue reading this...

Category: Syria | LEAVE A COMMENT

The Norwegian National Election: Europe’s Most Leftist Government Defeated by Right-Wing Coalition By Asbjørn Wahl and Roy Pedersen

22 September 2013 — The Bullet • Socialist Project E-Bulletin No. 883

The red-green coalition government in Norway, whose political platform when it took power in 2005 was called the most progressive in Europe, experienced a bitter defeat in the country’s parliamentary election on 9 September. A coalition of four centre-right and right-wing parties, including a right-wing populist party, gained a solid majority and are now negotiating the political platform for a new government.

Continue reading this...

Category: Europe | 1 Comment

Eviction Brixton: creating housing insecurity in London By Hannah Schling

22 July 2013 — Open Security

The marketisation of access to housing security is central to the increasingly normative experience of housing precarity in London. Lambeth Council’s eviction of long-term squatted and short-life housing co-op communities is pouring fuel onto the fire: making people homeless to clear the way for public housing stock sell-offs.

Continue reading this...

Category: London | LEAVE A COMMENT

CIA Admits It Was Behind Iran’s Coup: The agency finally owns up to its role in the 1953 operation By Malcolm Byrne

26 August 2013 — National Security Archive – Unredacted

Sixty years ago this Monday, on August 19, 1953, modern Iranian history took a critical turn when a U.S.- and British-backed coup overthrew the country’s prime minister, Mohammed Mossadegh. The event’s reverberations have haunted its orchestrators over the years, contributing to the anti-Americanism that accompanied the Shah’s ouster in early 1979, and even influencing the Iranians who seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran later that year. Continue reading this...

Greenwald partner sues Home Office as UK defends ‘Miranda op

20 August 2013 — RT

The UK Home Office says it has “to protect the public”, but Miranda has accused Britain of a “total abuse of power” and has said he will take legal action against the Home Office. The Guardian is “supportive” of his action.

Continue reading this...

The Gentification of the Left By Mike Wayne, Deidre O’Neill

19 August 2013 — New Left Project

The post-colonial philosopher Gayatri Spivak once famously asked: ‘Can the subaltern speak?’ Colonialism though is not just about race, it is also about that great unmentionable, class. And class colonization is one of the most central features of British social and political life. Continue reading this...

The Bullet: Connective Party or Return to a “War of Maneuver”?

16 August 2013 — The Bullet • Socialist Project E-Bulletin No. 865

For some two decades, the anti-globalization movement and its successors have assumed that society contains within itself – and automatically throws up – political oppositions and organizational forms independent of capital and of the state. There is simply the need to encourage the cumulative growth of society’s own potentialities for forming alternatives apart from the state and apart from the terrain of politics. Continue reading this...

‘Rocking the Foundations’ — the story of Australia’s pioneering red-green trade union

14 August 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal

An outstanding historical account of the “Green Bans” first introduced by the communist-led New South Wales Builders Labourers Federation (BLF) in the 1970s in response to community demand to preserve inner-city parkland and historic buildings. One of the first women to be accepted as a builders labourer, filmmaker Pat Fiske in 1985 traced the development of a union whose social and political activities challenged the notion of what a union should be. Continue reading this...

Professor Richard Shepherd and the Unnatural Death of Dr David Kelly: Haemorrhage from Cutting the Ulnar Artery. A Sole Cause of Death? By Dr. David Halpin

13 August 2013 — Global Research

The Mysterious Death of Dr David Kelly: "Subversion of Due Process" of the Law in the United Kingdom

These are three sentences from a short letter written by the author and published in the Morning Star 16th of December 2003.

As a past trauma and orthopaedic surgeon I cannot easily accept that even the deepest cut into one wrist would cause such exsanguination (bleeding out) that death resulted.  The two arteries are of matchstick size and would have quickly shut down and clotted. (He did not know then that the ulnar artery alone was transected ie cut across.)

Continue reading this...

The Absent Voices of the Imperial War Museums By Shah Jahan

13 August 2013 — New Left Project

The brainchild behind the Imperial War Museum, Sir Alfred Mond, said on its launch in June 1920: ‘The Museum was not conceived as a monument of military glory, but rather as a record of toil and sacrifice.’ Though he dedicated it to ‘the people of the Empire, as a record of their toil and sacrifice through these fateful years’, the Museum’s Board of Trustees was filled with British government appointees and a handful of representatives from colonial and dominion  governments. The ‘people’, whether of the Empire or Britain, had no say in how their toil and sacrifice was depicted. Continue reading this...

Category: History, UK, War | LEAVE A COMMENT