Video: How Indigenous Mexicans Stood up against NAFTA “Death Sentence”

3 January 2013 — Democracy Now!

Zapatista Uprising 20 Years Later

On the same day North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect on January 1, 1994, the Zapatista National Liberation Army and people of Chiapas declared war on the Mexican government, saying that NAFTA meant death to indigenous peoples. They took over five major towns in Chiapas with fully armed women and men. The uprising was a shock, even for those who for years worked in the very communities where the rebel army had been secretly organizing. To learn about the impact of the uprising 20 years later and the challenges they continue to face, we speak with Peter Rosset, professor on rural social movements San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico. Continue reading this...

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Guatemala’s Ríos Montt Genocide Conviction: Omen for US Presidents and Their Hired Assassins By Jay Janson

18 May 2013 — Global Research 

Presiding Judge, “he knew about everything that was going on and he did not stop it, despite having the power to stop it from being carried out.” US President Ronald Reagan also had the power, greater power, to stop the massacres being perpetrated by dictator General and President Ríos Montt. Instead visited him in Guatemala City and praised Rios Montt as “a man of great personal integrity and commitment. Who was more guilty?

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Photo Essay: Profit and Violence in the Name of Comprehensive Immigration Reform By Todd Miller

17 April 2013 — NACLA Border Wars

On April 16, the U.S. Senate’s so-called “Gang of 8″ released their 844-page plan for comprehensive immigration reform entitled the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. The border policing aspect of the bill (among many other things) envisions $3 billion for more surveillance systems, including unmanned aerial drones, $1.5 billion for more barriers on the boundary, and the addition of 3,500 more Customs and Border Protection agents (CBP includes the U.S. Border Patrol). This would be on top of the $18 billion (figure from 2012) that the U.S. government already spends on border and immigration enforcement per year, an expense that is more than all other federal law enforcement agencies combined.

Racism, Drugs and Crime By Patricia Murphy-Robinson

16 April 2013 

 

Today, I learned with great sorrow of the death of a woman who had a very profound affect on my life. Born I think, on exactly the same month, day and year as Fidel Castro, Patricia Murphy-Robinson died on 11 April 2013. I knew that she’d been ill having spoken to her a few months ago in Jacksonville Fla, where she lived, but just how ill she had been, she kept hidden from me and wasn’t until I got an email from someone who knew her, that I found out. Continue reading this...

Imperialism, Unequal Development and Forced Migration By Raúl Delgado Wise

20 February 2013 – Monthly Review

class=”subtitle”>The Migration and Labor Question Today 

It is impossible to disentangle the migration and labor question today without a deep understanding of the nature of contemporary capitalism, namely, neoliberal globalization. One of the main features of the new global architecture, boosted by the emergence of one of the most distressing global crises since the Great Depression, is the assault on the labor and living conditions of the majority of the global working class, and in particular the migrant workforce, which is among the most vulnerable segments of this class. This essay will analyze some key aspects of the system that contemporary migration is embedded in, with emphasis on the process of segmentation and the growing precariousness (precarization) of labor markets worldwide.

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