National Security Archive: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

4 August 2015 — National Security Archive

The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

A Collection of Primary Sources

Updated National Security Archive Posting Marks 70th Anniversary of the Atomic Bombings of Japan and the End of World War II

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The Bombing of Nagasaki August 9, 1945: The Un-Censored Version By Dr. Gary G. Kohls

7 August 2013 — Global Research

68 years ago, at 11:02 am on August 9th, 1945, an all-Christian bomber crew dropped a plutonium bomb, on Nagasaki, Japan. That bomb was the second and last atomic weapon that had as its target a civilian city. Somewhat ironically, as will be elaborated upon later in this essay, Nagasaki was the most Christian city in Japan and ground zero was the largest cathedral in the Orient.

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Hiroshima and Nagasaki: American High School Textbooks Perpetuate The Big Lie By Pat Elder

2 August 2013 — War is a Crime

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: American High School Textbooks Perpetuate The Big Lie

hiroshima

This summer the world will pause to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Most Americans are still supportive of Truman’s decision despite overwhelming historical evidence the bomb had “nothing to do with the end of the war,” in the words of Major General Curtis E. LeMay.

 

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Depleted Uranium: The BBC’s John Simpson does a hatchet job on Fallujah’s genetically damaged children By William Bowles

1 April 2013 — williambowles.info

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Video: The Bomb Sends a Message to the World – Untold History

27 March 2013 — The Real News Network

 

Peter Kuznick (co-author with Oliver Stone of The Untold History of the Unites States): The atomic bomb did not end the war with Japan, it was a threat to the Soviet Union that the US would dominate the post-war world – 

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From the horse’s mouth

20 November 2012

If anyone has any doubts about the racist nature of Israeli society then the following quotes by Gilad Sharon, son of Ariel Sharon should clear the mist from your eyes:

“There should be no electricity in Gaza, no gasoline or moving vehicles, nothing. Then they’d really call for a ceasefire,” he wrote. “We need to flatten entire neighbourhoods in Gaza. Flatten all of Gaza. The Americans didn’t stop with Hiroshima – the Japanese weren’t surrendering fast enough, so they hit Nagasaki, too.” — Jerusalem Post

Fidel Castro Denounces Media Deception, Lies

22 October, 2012 — Prensa Latina

The leader of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro, said today that although many people in the world are deceived by the media which is almost completely in the hands of privileged and wealthy owners who publish garbage, generally speaking, people are less and less taken in by such lies.

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The Real Reason America Used Nuclear Weapons Against Japan. It Was Not To End the War Or Save Lives By Washington’s Blog

14 October 2012 — Global Research – Washington’s Blog

Atomic Weapons Were Not Needed to End the War or Save Lives

Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives.

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The Criminality of Nuclear Deterrence Today: International Law as Anchoring Ground By Professor Francis A. Boyle

XVIIIth Conference “Mut Zur Ethic”: Direct Democracy Feldkirch, Austria

Ladies and gentlemen:

I am very happy to be speaking with you this evening. I want to express my gratitude to Zeit-Fragen for publishing the German language edition of my book The Criminality of Nuclear Deterrence (Clarity Press: 2002) which comes out now on the anniversary of the end of the Second World War. At this time 65 years ago, Japan surrendered to the United States after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the incineration of 250,000 completely innocent human beings.
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Japan urges ban on nukes 65 years after Nagasaki bombing

15 August, 2010 — RT Top Stories

The Japanese city of Nagasaki has remembered those killed by the second atom bomb dropped by the US in 1945. A minute of silence was observed on Monday to commemorate the moment when the bomb wiped out most of the city.

Tens of thousands of people were incinerated instantly as the bomb nicknamed ‘Fat Man’ buried the city under an explosion, with many more dying from diseases linked to radiation ever since.

Those who survived the attack say it was unjustifiably cruel and insist on a universal ban on nuclear weapons.

Sixty-five years ago Sumiteru Taniguchi was enjoying a simple morning bicycle ride when, in a tragic instant, his life changed forever.

‘I was thrown to the ground and I heard an ear-piercing sound,’ Sumiteru recalled. ‘I thought I had been killed, but I encouraged myself not to die, that it was important to go on living.’

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Taras DYACHENKO Hiroshima and Modernity

5 August, 2010 — Strategic Culture Foundation

Sixty five years ago, on August 6, 1945, US bomber B-29 dropped a nuclear bomb which was roughly 2,000 times more powerful than the biggest munitions used over the entire past history on the Japanese city of Hiroshima

***

Fighting ended in Europe in May, 1945, but the war still raged in the Far East where Japan continued to mount resistance. In July, 1945 the Soviet Union confirmed its earlier pledge to join the campaign, part of Stalin’s motivation clearly being to reverse the humiliating consequences of Russia’s defeat in the Russo-Japanese war in the early XX century.

In the meantime, the Western allies of the USSR decided to implement a plan charted in the process of their separate negotiations. On August 6, US bomber B-29 dropped a nuclear bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, literally turning the place into hell on Earth. The devastations were unprecedented: the blast wiped out the population in the proximity of the epicenter, leaving survivors with severe burns. According to Japanese estimates, the death toll in Hiroshima topped 240,000, with 50,000 wounded or missing. A US Army combat report said the timing of the attack was meant to maximize the thermal impact of the explosion.

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Why World War II ended with Mushroom Clouds By Jacques R. Pauwels

6 August, 2010 — Global Research

65 years ago, August 6 and 9, 1945: Hiroshima and Nagasaki

“On Monday, August 6, 1945, at 8:15 AM, the nuclear bomb ‘Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima by an American B-29 bomber, the Enola Gay, directly killing an estimated 80,000 people. By the end of the year, injury and radiation brought total casualties to 90,000-140,000.”[1]

“On August 9, 1945, Nagasaki was the target of the world’s second atomic bomb attack at 11:02 a.m., when the north of the city was destroyed and an estimated 40,000 people were killed by the bomb nicknamed ‘Fat Man.’ The death toll from the atomic bombing totalled 73,884, as well as another 74,909 injured, and another several hundred thousand diseased and dying due to fallout and other illness caused by radiation.”[2]

In the European Theatre, World War II ended in early May 1945 with the capitulation of Nazi Germany. The “Big Three” on the side of the victors – Great Britain, the United States, and the Soviet Union – now faced the complex problem of the postwar reorganization of Europe. The United States had entered the war rather late, in December 1941, and had only started to make a truly significant military contribution to the Allied victory over Germany with the landings in Normandy in June 1944, less than one year before the end of the hostilities. When the war against Germany ended, however, Washington sat firmly and confidently at the table of the victors, determined to achieve what might be called its “war aims.”

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Never Forget The Lessons Of Yesterday For The Sake Of Tomorrow By Vincent Guarisco

23 February, 2009

“You can walk away from these stories today, but if you choose to follow them they will become a profound part of you and will deeply affect your life.” — Anthony Guarisco, Founder and director, International Alliance of Atomic Veterans (IAAV, with AAV here in the US), to photo-journalist James Lerager. (Note: Anthony was the first of many Atomic Veterans Lerager interviewed)

In a world full of mind-wrenching turmoil, I am a gentle dreamer searching for some soulful serenity. But in reality, my dreams are not always so pleasant when I revisit the arc of history when our pentagon warmongers worked day and night to demonize our own Stars and Stripes when they unleashed nuclear hell-on-earth to establish the most powerful military presence on earth. Indeed, the Hibakusha people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki know this lesson well. Just as surely as all 300,000 Atomic Veterans (including my father) know they are the government’s best-kept-secret when they were quickly deemed “expendable” by Uncle Sam’s nuclear weapons testing programs.

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Anti-Empire Report, July 4, 2008 By William Blum

Anti-Empire Report, July 4, 2008

Read this or George W. Bush will be president the rest of your life

www.killinghope.org

Some thoughts on ‘patriotism’ written on July 4

Most important thought: I’m sick and tired of this thing called ‘patriotism‘.

The Japanese pilots who bombed Pearl Harbor were being patriotic. The German people who supported Hitler and his conquests were being patriotic, fighting for the Fatherland. All the Latin American military dictators who overthrew democratically-elected governments and routinely tortured people were being patriotic — saving their beloved country from ‘communism’.

General Augusto Pinochet of Chile: ‘I would like to be remembered as a man who served his country.'[1]

P.W. Botha, former president of apartheid South Africa: ‘I am not going to repent. I am not going to ask for favours. What I did, I did for my country.'[2]

Pol Pot, mass murderer of Cambodia: ‘I want you to know that everything I did, I did for my country.'[3]

Tony Blair, former British prime minister, defending his role in the murder of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis: ‘I did what I thought was right for our country.'[4]

I won’t bore you with what George W. has said.

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