DANISH LEGAL OPINION CONCLUDES 5G CONTRAVENES HUMAN & ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS

4 November 2019 — ES-Ireland 

Attorney-at-law Christian Jensen, of Bonnor Lawyers in Denmark, examined potential health damages and risks of 5G in relation to human rights and environmental conventions.

The legal opinion is centred around results that have positively documented actual damages or risks to humans, animals and plants.  Jensen points out that this research is “inherently of much greater significance than examinations which have been incapable of identifying a damage or risk thereof, since the latter group does not in itself exclude the possibility that there exist real damage or risks”.

He explains that “If it has on one occasion defensibly been scientifically proven that there is a damaging effect or risk of damage, then the fact that ten other defensible trials did not show such an effect or risk is irrelevant.  It is then merely up to the scientific community to clarify why the ten defensible trials did not show what is scientifically proven, in order to better understand why and how the damages occur or could occur”.

In his final remarks, on page 64 of the 75-page document, Jensen states that:

“It is the conclusion of this legal opinion that establishing and activating a 5G-network, as it is currently described,  would  be  in  contravention  of  current  human  and  environmental  laws enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, EU regulations, and the Bern- and Bonn-conventions.

The reason is the very significant body of scientific documentation available, showing that radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation is harmful and dangerous to the health of humans (particularly children), animals and plants.

This also applies when the radiation remains within the limits recommended by ICNIRP and currently used in Denmark as well as broadly within the EU.”

The legal opinion was provided at the request of the Danish Institute for Public Health, the Council for Health-Safe Telecommunications, the EHS-association and the Danish Health Association May Day.

This opinion is also relevant to Australia.  Australia is a signatory to both the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and the Bonn convention (also known as the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals).  European Union directives don’t apply in Australia; however, decisions made by the European Court of Human Rights, which has responsibility for monitoring compliance with the rights and freedoms set out by the European Convention on Human Rights, influence the development of human rights law in Australia.

Access the Danish legal opinion document HERE.

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