Leveson’s Punch and Judy show on the press masks ‘hacking’ on a scale you can barely imagine By John Pilger

6 December 2012 — John Pilger

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In the week Lord Leveson published almost a million words about his inquiry into the “culture, practice and ethics” of Britain‘s corporate press, two illuminating books about media and freedom were also published. Their contrast with the Punch and Judy show staged by Leveson is striking.

For 36 years, Project Censored, based in California, has documented critically important stories unreported or suppressed by the media most Americans watch or read. This year’s report is 013: Dispatches from the media revolution by Mickey Huff and Andy Lee Roth (Seven Stories Press). They describe the omissions of “mainstream” journalism as “history in the un-making”. Unlike Leveson, their investigation demonstrates the sham of a system claiming to be free. Among their top 25 censored stories are these:

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It’s time we recognised the Blair government’s criminality By John Pilger

16 February 2012 — John Pilger

In the kabuki theatre of British parliamentary politics, great crimes do not happen and criminals go free. It is theatre after all; the pirouettes matter, not actions taken at remove in distance and culture from their consequences. It is a secure arrangement guarded by cast and critics alike. The farewell speech of one of the most artful, Tony Blair, had “a sense of moral conviction running through it”, effused the television presenter Jon Snow, as if Blair‘s appeal to Kabuki devotees was mystical. That he was a war criminal was irrelevant.

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Israeli Impunity: The Queen has lost her royal marbles

15 September 2011 — Desertpeace

Britain has amended a law that allowed for issuing arrest warrants against Israeli politicians who visit the country, British Ambassador Matthew Gould announced Thursday. Gould called opposition leader Tzipi Livni, against whom an arrest warrant was issued in 2009, and told her the Queen has signed the amendment ‘to ensure that the UK’s justice system can no longer be abused for political reasons.’

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