Black Agenda Report for 28 August, 2013: The "Dreamer" With a Kill List, the "Dreamer" as Zombie, Syria Enters American Hell

28 August 2013 — Black Agenda Report

This week in Black Agenda Report

by BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

Gary Younge points out that King’s “I Have A Dream” speech wasn’t offered as the penultimate moment of his career till after his death. Those who offer it were the same corporate media honchos who first elevated, then slimed and slandered King the last year of his life. “The Dreamer” too is their construct, as far from the man who lived and died as an ordinary person from a brain-eating zombie.

by BAR executive editor Glen Ford

The most powerful – and violent – man in the world was made the star of the commemoration of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King. “The grave-markers of the martyrs of the Black Freedom Movement – in their thousands – have been reduced to cobblestones on the road to the Obama presidency.”

by BAR editor and senior columnist Margaret Kimberley

With the imminent attack on Syria, Barack Obama prepares to add to his personal legacy of illegal wars based entirely on lies. The corporate media will eagerly sell the newest U.S. aggression, starting with the absurd premise that Syria would launch a chemical attack “when it is winning the war fomented by the United States, NATO, Israel, Saudi Arabia and other gulf monarchies.”

A Black Agenda Radio commentary by executive editor Glen Ford

Four years ago, huge numbers of Blacks thought African Americans were doing well, despite the facts of the economic meltdown – a kind of mass madness. But a new survey shows “a portion of Black folks have snapped out of the delirium, and now see the world, and their actual position in it, more clearly.”

by Paul Street

Dr. Martin Luther King was a social revolutionary who preached that “a storm is rising against the theprivileged minority of the earth” that will result in a “just distribution of the fruits” of the planet. Barack Obama “has made it clear that Dr. King’s unpaid promissory note will remain un-cashed under his watch.” The First Black President disgraces the podium from which Dr. King spoke 50 years ago.

by Bill Quigley

The “new” New Orleans that developers hoped to construct when 100,000 poor Black people were purged from the city is still a place of daunting poverty. “African American households in the metro New Orleans area earned 50 percent less than white households.” By almost every measurement, only the rich and white have prospered.

by Auset Marian Lewis

When neighborhood distress is taken into account, Blacks and whites kill each other at roughly the same rate. In New York, whites stopped and frisked by police are more likely than Blacks and Latinos to be carrying firearms. “If Bloomberg is really looking for guns, I suggest that he check white people.”

by Seema Sadanandan

Black children in poorer sections of the Nation’s Capitol grow up under constant hyper-surveillance of police. The armed occupation of their communities is anything but benign. “A community’s desire to be free from crime is not an invitation to treat all men in that community as suspects.”

by Wangui Kimari

Recent police excessive force against mass demonstrations in Brazil should not overshadow institutional state violence directed against the nation’s poor Blacks. “Many Black communities in Brazil are living in a state of siege” – levels of mass-produced death that can justifiably be called genocide.”

NSA Could Ensnare Anyone in National Security Trap

“Every single person in this country owes Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning a debt of gratitude,” said Dr. Marsha Coleman-Adebayo, renowned whistleblower and a founder of the No FEAR Coalition. The NSA program that tracks human networks endangers all Americans, said Coleman-Adebayo, “because everyone is only a person or two or three or four away from being implicated in some scheme that the National Security State comes up with.” She called Bradley Manning’s 35-year prison sentence for exposing government secrets an example of growing “tyranny.”

Ray Kelly’s Rise Halted By Stop-and-Frisk Ruling

It is highly unlikely that New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly will be appointed head of Homeland Security, said Robert Gangi, of the Police Reform Organizing Project of the Urban Justice Center. A federal court found that the city’s stop-and-frisk practices routinely violate the constitutional rights of Blacks and Latinos. “There is now a big black eye on the face of New York City policing,” said Gangi. “Ray Kelly is no longer the iconic law enforcement figure he was a short two years ago.”

Black Is Back Coalition Magnifies Grassroots Forces

The betrayals and predations of the Black Misleadership Class can be overcome by out-organizing them. “Our objective is to replace that misleadership, not just to complain about it,” said Omali Yeshitela, chairman of the Black Is Back Coalition for Social Justice, Peace and Reparations. Black is Back seeks to “provide the ability for all of these” grassroots organizations “to come together and to magnify their presence many times over,” said Yeshitela. The coalition recently held its national conference in Harlem.

Cornel West on Obama and the New Jim Crow

The Obama administration seems to believe it is immune from effective Black criticism. “It’s sad to see us pimped like that,” said Dr. Cornel West, the activist and academic currently based at Union Theological Seminary, in New York. “All of our suffering is rendered invisible because they know we will be highly protective of them.” The administration has “that kind of power, that kind of bully pulpit, but they can’t say a mumbling word about the New Jim Crow – and they’ve been in office for five years. That’s disgusting!” Dr. West spoke on the latest edition of Black Agenda TV.

Nursing Students Charge Fraud in Philadelphia

Six Black women, who call themselves the Liberation of Students Rights Group of Philadelphia, charge the now defunct St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing cheated them out of $22,000 each and a year of their lives. Sabrina Whitaker said she and her fellow students, all college graduates at the time, had heard that the school had a Black dean, and “wanted to work in an area that was African American.” But the school turned out to be unaccredited. “We had to share gloves, we had to share needles when learning how to do IVs,” said Whitaker. The women hope to prevail in court, to prove that “if you keep fighting, keep striving for what you believe in, your dream too can come true.”

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