National Security Archive: Operation Condor Verdict: GUILTY!

28 May 2016 — National Security Archive

Argentine Federal Court Concludes 3-Year Trial on Multinational Repression
National Security Archive Provided Declassified Evidence; Hails Historic Ruling

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 551

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Washington D.C., May 27, 2016 – As a federal tribunal in Buenos Aires announced guilty verdicts in the historic prosecution of eighteen Argentine military officers for participating in the coordinated, cross-border system of repression known as “Operation Condor,” the National Security Archive today hailed the ruling as a “major milestone for the principle of human rights and the pursuit of accountability for human rights violators.” 

“Some 40 years after many of the Condor crimes were committed,” according to the Archive’s Southern Cone analyst Carlos Osorio, who testified at the trial and provided hundreds of declassified documents as evidence, “the victims and the human rights organizations that have represented them have finally found justice.”

“In the case of the Condor proceedings it was possible to include thousands of documents from different sources as evidence,“ noted the lead prosecutor, Pablo Ouvina. “We had permanent contact with the National Security Archive.”

The Archive today posted a series of declassified U.S. documents that were used in the trial and that tell the story of Operation Condor, what U.S. officials knew, when they knew it, and what they did and did not do with that knowledge.

Check out today’s posting at the National Security Archive

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THE NATIONAL SECURITY ARCHIVE is an independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. The Archive collects and publishes declassified documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). A tax-exempt public charity, the Archive receives no U.S. government funding; its budget is supported by publication royalties and donations from foundations and individuals.

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