False Warnings of Soviet Missile Attacks Put U.S. Forces on Alert

16 March 2020 — National Security Archive

Command post for all NORAD operations

Eight Minutes After Warning Screens Showed 1,400 Soviet ICBMS Approaching North America, on 9 November 1979, NORAD Concluded “Attack Was Underway”

William Odom on 3 June 1980 Pentagon Missile Warning Conference Call: “I Monitored the Call Last Night – Eerie”

After 3 Incidents in May and June, Secretary of Defense Brown Advised President Carter that “I Consider the Situation To Be Very Serious”

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The CIA’s ‘Minerva’ Secret

11 February 2020 — National Security Archive

Operation Condor Countries Used Crypto AG Devices Without Realizing the CIA Owned the Company, National Security Archive Documents Reveal

Encryption revelations raise questions about U.S. official knowledge of Argentina “dirty war” atrocities, Chile’s Letelier assassination, Southern Cone military dictatorships

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Starting to Crack a Hard Target: U.S. Intelligence Efforts Against the Soviet Missile Program through 1957

5 February 2020 — National Security Archive

U.S. Learned of the First ICBM Test from a Soviet Press Release and the Second from a Remark Made to a French Politician 

Unaware of Sputnik I and II until They Were in Orbit

Washington, D.C., February 5, 2020 – In the eyes of U.S. intelligence and the military services, the greatest threat to American national security during the early Cold War was the emerging Soviet missile program with its ability to deliver nuclear weapons to targets across the United States.  Before the era of satellite surveillance, the U.S. scrambled to develop ever more effective intelligence-gathering methods, notably the U-2 spy plane, spurred on by having missed practically every important Soviet breakthrough of the time – including the first intercontinental ballistic missile tests and the world-changing Sputnik launches.

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NSA: Documenting Iran-U.S. Relations, 1978-2015

20 December 2019 — National Security Archive

Every U.S. President Tried – at Some Point and for Different Reasons – to Engage with Iran

New Digital National Security Archive Collection of 14,000 pages Covers the 1978-79 Revolution to the 2015 Nuclear Deal (JCPOA)

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 692

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1979 Iran Hostage Crisis Recalled

4 November 2019 — National Security Archive

Tehran Embassy Takeover Launched 444-Day Saga with Long-Standing Implications for Iran, United States, and Global Politics

Documents Show Brzezinski Proposed Considering Replacement of Khomeini or Even Direct Intervention, but Carter Declined

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 689

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Nuclear Weapons and Turkey Since 1959

30 October 2019 — National Security Archive

Members of Congress Worried in 1960 That Leaders of a Coup “Might Seize Control” of Weapons

Other U.S. Officials Feared Risks of Accidental War or Overreaction to Local Crises

During Mid-1960s Turkish Officials Were Interested in Producing an “Atomic Bomb”

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 688

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The Vela Flash: Forty Years Ago

22 September 2019 — National Security Archive

Controversy Hovers over Possible Nuclear Signal Detected in South Atlantic in 1979; Israeli or South African Origin Suspected by Some Experts – and President Carter

CIA Saw “Probability of a Nuclear Test as 90% Plus,” According to Newly Posted Document

Additional Evidence Casts Doubts on White House Science Advisers’ Dismissal of Possibility of a Nuclear Test

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National Security Archive Joins Media Groups Versus Unlimited Gag Orders

3 May 2019 — National Security Archive

Amicus Brief Argues for Court Review, Time Limits on Secrecy of National Security Letters

Washington D.C., May 3, 2019 – The National Security Archive, along with 15 other media organizations, filed a “friend of the court” brief on April 29 challenging the FBI’s authority to issue national security letters (NSLs) without any judicial oversight and under indefinite gag orders. The letters demand business records from a wide array of organizations for national security investigations, and their accompanying gag orders prohibit the recipient from speaking with anyone about the NSL, often permanently.

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Preparing for Computer Network Operations: USCYBERCOM Documents Trace Path to Operational Cyber Force

3 May 2019 — National Security Archive

Evolution of Cyber Mission Force and Joint Force Headquarters – Cyber portrayed in annual orders to build the force

  • Declassified documents give insight into USCYBERCOM Mission Essential Tasks and Operational Processes
  • Briefing slide reveals impact of 2013 government shutdown on USCYBERCOM training and development
  • US Military Cyberspace Tasking Cycle adapted from air operations; cyber operations adhere to joint targeting doctrine
  • OIG Report suggests development process outpaced strategic planning

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