Libya Mostly Mainstream Newslinks for 22 February, 2011

22 February, 2011 — creative-i.info

Oil prices surge 5% on Libya unrest
CNNMoney
By Aaron Smith, staff writer February 22, 2011: 12:26 PM ET NEW YORK
(CNNMoney) — Oil prices jumped 5% Tuesday, spiking as high as $98 a barrel
earlier in the session, as the crisis in Libya sparked concern that the
turmoil roiling the Middle East …
money.cnn.com/2011/02/22/markets/oil_libya_markets/

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Bahrain Mostly Mainstream Newslinks for 23 February, 2011

23 February, 2011 — creative-i.info

Protests in Bahrain Become Test of Wills
New York Times
Freed political prisoners were tossed in the air by a jubilant crowd in
Manama, Bahrain, on Tuesday. The king released the prisoners as a
conciliatory gesture. More Photos “ By MICHAEL SLACKMAN and NADIM AUDI
MANAMA, Bahrain — More than 100000 …
www.nytimes.com/2011/02/23/world/middleeast/23bahrain.html

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Book Review: To the Barricades! Then and Now… By Peter Monaghan

21 February, 2011 — SolidarityEconomy.net via Chronicle of Higher Education

barricade.jpgIn the 15th to 19th centuries, when Europeans rebelled against their rulers, they frequently heaped up barrels, paving stones, and any other handy objects to create immovable masses in city streets.

Such defensive and tactical structures went together so readily, so cooperatively, that it seemed the insurrectionists were acting on instinct.

In a new book, The Insurgent Barricade (University of California Press), Mark Traugott relates the history of “the most striking embodiment” of the revolutionary spirit of the times. And it is the dissemination of “barricade consciousness” that most interests the scholar, a professor of history and sociology at the University of California at Santa Cruz. The barricades show, he writes, how people choose and symbolize the way they voice their discontent and collective hopes.

A touchstone of his research, he says, has been a 1970s concept from the historian, sociologist, and political scientist Charles Tilly, the “repertoire of collective action,” referring to the range of protest techniques available at any particular place and time.

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Turning against Mu’ammar Gaddafi of Libya By Nureddin Sabir

20 February 2011 — Editor, Redress Information & Analysis

Nureddin Sabir recounts a painful journey of hope, disappointment, betrayal, blood and murder that has seen him turn from loyal supporter to vehement opponent of Colonel Mu’ammar Gaddafi and his regime in Libya.

From Zintan in the west of Libya to Benghazi, Al-Bayda, Derna and Tobruk in the east, Libyans have been rising up against the rule of Colonel Mu’ammar Gaddafi since a “Day of Rage” was declared by pro-freedom activists on 17 February.
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Information Clearing House Newsletter 22 February, 2011: “CIA Spy” Was Giving Nuclear Material to Al-Qaeda, says Report

22 February, 2011 — Information Clearing House

Petraeus: Afghans Burned Their Own Children
Petraeus’s comments on coalition attack reportedly offend Karzai government

By Joshua Partlow
Gen. David H. Petraeus suggested Sunday at the presidential palace that Afghans caught up in a coalition attack in northeastern Afghanistan might have burned their own children to exaggerate claims of civilian casualties. www.informationclearinghouse.info/article27542.htm

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Reflections of Fidel: The Plan is to Occupy Libya

21 February, 2011 — Monthly Review

The nature of a capitalist system depends upon the institutional framework that supports and shapes it.

Oil has become the principal wealth in the hands of the great Yankee transnationals; through this energy source they had an instrument that considerably expanded their political power in the world. It was their main weapon when they decided to easily liquidate the Cuban Revolution as soon as the first just and sovereign laws were passed in our Homeland: depriving it of oil.

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Fruits of Revolt Won’t be Felt Until Power Out of Army’s Hands By Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya

21 February, 2011 — grtv

Shockwaves from upheavals in Tunisia and Egypt have spread all across the greater Middle East, with opposition protests sweeping through other countries in the region. Clashes between rival demonstrators have once again gripped Yemen in what’s now the eighth day of unrest.

Anti-government activists have been using social networks to call for as many people as possible to hit the streets on Friday. They are demanding the country’s president Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down after more than thirty years in power.

Protests also turned violent in Libya, where at least 24 people have been killed in recent days, in clashes with security forces. Police are reported to have used firearms to disperse the crowd. And thousands of mourners gathered in Bahrain at the funerals of anti-government protesters killed in a brutal crackdown on Thursday.

Mideast expert Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya says that although the region is in turmoil, it’s hard to say just how fundamental the changes will be.

Fruits of Revolt Won't be Felt Until Power Out of Army's Hands By Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya

21 February, 2011 — grtv

Shockwaves from upheavals in Tunisia and Egypt have spread all across the greater Middle East, with opposition protests sweeping through other countries in the region. Clashes between rival demonstrators have once again gripped Yemen in what’s now the eighth day of unrest.

Anti-government activists have been using social networks to call for as many people as possible to hit the streets on Friday. They are demanding the country’s president Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down after more than thirty years in power.

Protests also turned violent in Libya, where at least 24 people have been killed in recent days, in clashes with security forces. Police are reported to have used firearms to disperse the crowd. And thousands of mourners gathered in Bahrain at the funerals of anti-government protesters killed in a brutal crackdown on Thursday.

Mideast expert Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya says that although the region is in turmoil, it’s hard to say just how fundamental the changes will be.

The Popular Uprising in Egypt: The Military Machine Remains Intact, The Political Status Quo Prevails By Mahdi Darius Nazemroaya

21 February, 2011 — Global Research

The same group of Egyptian generals running Cairo presently also formed the backbone of the Mubarak regime. There has been no real change in government. The military junta represents a continuation of the Mubarak regime. The previous so-called civilian administration and the Egyptian High Council of the Armed Forces are virtually the same body.

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Daniel Bell: The Empire Loses a Publicist: The Epitaph of an Ideologue By Prof James Petras

23 February, 2011 — Global Research

The recent death of one of the United States’ most prominent sociologists, Harvard Professor Daniel Bell, and the effusive eulogies that have accompanied his obituaries highlight the importance of ideological utility over scientific rigor. Typical of the mass media’s hagiographic write-ups is the obituary in the Financial Times (2/12-13/1, p. 5), which claimed that ‘Few men are given the gift of seeing into the future, but Daniel Bell … was one of them … with uncanny accuracy’. Further on, the ‘puff’ piece pronounced that, ‘Few thinkers in the second half of the 20th century managed to catch the social and cultural shifts of the times with such range and in such detail as he did’. No doubt there are some important reasons why Bell warrants such effusive praise, but it certainly is not because of his understanding of the political, economic, ideological developments which transpired in the United States during his intellectual life.

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VTJP Palestine/Israel Newslinks 22 February, 2011: Israeli bulldozers bury Bedouin village

22 February, 2011 — VTJP

News

International Middle East Media Center

Soldiers Invade Tallousa Village Near Nablus
IMEMC – Wednesday February 23, 2011 – 03:32, Israeli soldiers invaded on Tuesday afternoon Tallousa village, north of the northern West Bank city of Nablus and blocked a number of roads.

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