Black Agenda Radio for Week of January 18, 2021

18 January 2021 — Black Agenda Report

Black Agenda Radio with Margaret Kimberley and Glen Ford 
US Imperialism Was in Disarray in 2020 / US Genocide Against Blacks, Now and in 1951 / Lumumba Assassination Changed Black American Politics.

US Imperialism Was in Disarray in 2020 

Black Agenda Radio with Margaret Kimberley and Glen Ford 
Black Alliance for Peace national organizer Ajamu Baraka told a year-end conference of the Black Is Back Coalition that “the US settler state is facing the most serious crisis of legitimacy since the collapse of the capitalist economy” in the Great Depression. Betty Davis, of the Coalition’s Community Control of Schools Working Group, said: “The federal budget that comes down to New York City is the 23rd biggest budget in the world, but you don’t control that money and that’s why you are not having the same services as your white counterparts.”

US Genocide Against Blacks, Now and in 1951 

Black Agenda Radio with Margaret Kimberley and Glen Ford 
The Black leftists that presented a petition to the United Nations, 70 years ago, charging the US with genocide against Black Americans, understood that “there is a linked fate between what’s happening to Black people in the US and what is going to happen” to other racialized and oppressed people around the world, said Dr Charisse Burden-Stelly, speaking at an online commemoration of the event. The “We Charge Genocide” campaign was led by entertainer-activist Paul Robeson and Black members of the Communist Party.

Lumumba Assassination Changed Black American Politics 

Black Agenda Radio with Margaret Kimberley and Glen Ford 
A panel of academics and activists marked the 1961 assassination of Patrice Lumumba, the Congo’s first elected prime minister, by agents of the US and Belgium. Texas A&M professor Ira Dworkin, author of “Congo Love Song: African American Culture and the Crisis of the Colonial State,” pointed out that it was Black women, led by singer Abbey Lincoln, who petitioned for Lumumba’s release from arrest, and later organized against US policy in Congo. These protests “did create a shift” in Black American politics towards confrontation with US policies in Africa and the world, Dworkin told the online seminar.

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