From 9/11 to Shoplifting: Assange in the Context of the European Arrest Warrant By Nina Cross

27 June 2019 — 21st Century Wire


Nina Cross
21st Century Wire

It is astonishing to think that the many coordinated attacks leveled against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange by the governments of the Britain, Sweden, Ecuador and the US, have all been stacked, in their colossal forms, on the tiny European Arrest Warrant (EAW).  This little manhunt-widget gifted the US and its allies the power to corner Assange like a chess piece.  They have used the EAW in a way that suggests their motto always has been ‘mighty oaks from little acorns grow.’

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Assange: The Missing Step By Craig Murray

20 May 2019 — Craig Murray

In Sweden, prosecutors have applied to the Swedish courts to issue a warrant for Julian’s arrest. There is a tremendous back story to that simple statement.

The European Arrest Warrant must be issued from one country to another by a judicial authority. The original Swedish request for Assange’s extradition was not issued by any court, but simply by the prosecutor. This was particularly strange, as the Chief Prosecutor of Stockholm had initially closed the case after deciding there was no case to answer, and then another, highly politically motivated, prosecutor had reopened the case and issued a European Arrest Warrant, without going to any judge for confirmation.

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Wikileaks Newslinks 3-4 November 2011

4 November 2011 — williambowles.info

4 November 2011
Key people in WikiLeaks saga are divided on Assange extradition

CNN
A court ruled Wednesday that WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange will be extradited to Sweden to face questioning over accusations of sex crimes made by two women, despite his legal battle to stay in Britain. Some key players in the WikiLeaks saga are …
http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/02/world/europe/wikileaks-insiders-assange-react/?hpt=wo_mid

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Assange extradition reveals political bias of British justice — RT

25 February, 2011 — RT

assange-extradite.jpg

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

A ‘rubber-stamping process’ – that is how the founder of WikiLeaks, whistleblower Julian Assange, described a London court’s decision to extradite him to Sweden to face questions over rape allegations.

­He said the ruling did not catch him by surprise, and that he is planning to appeal.

Assange posed some interesting questions: ‘Why is it that I am subject, a non-profit free-speech activist, to a US$360,000 bail? Why is it that I am kept under electronic house arrest when I have not even been charged in any country?’

And he is not the only one asking those questions, particularly as the British government has a history of granting asylum to some fairly controversial characters, including Russian business tycoon Boris Berezovsky. Continue reading

Assange extradition reveals political bias of British justice — RT

25 February, 2011 — RT

assange-extradite.jpg

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

A ‘rubber-stamping process’ – that is how the founder of WikiLeaks, whistleblower Julian Assange, described a London court’s decision to extradite him to Sweden to face questions over rape allegations.

­He said the ruling did not catch him by surprise, and that he is planning to appeal.

Assange posed some interesting questions: ‘Why is it that I am subject, a non-profit free-speech activist, to a US$360,000 bail? Why is it that I am kept under electronic house arrest when I have not even been charged in any country?’

And he is not the only one asking those questions, particularly as the British government has a history of granting asylum to some fairly controversial characters, including Russian business tycoon Boris Berezovsky.

Continue reading