The Coming Show Trial of Julian Assange by Chris Hedges

18 June 2019 — Truthdig

On Friday morning I was in a small courtroom at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London. Julian Assange, held in Belmarsh Prison and dressed in a pale-blue prison shirt, appeared on a video screen directly in front of me. Assange, his gray hair and beard neatly trimmed, slipped on heavy, dark-frame glasses at the start of the proceedings. He listened intently as Ben Brandon, the prosecutor, seated at a narrow wooden table, listed the crimes he allegedly had committed and called for his extradition to the United States to face charges that could result in a sentence of 175 years. The charges include the release of unredacted classified material that posed a “grave” threat to “human intelligence sources” and “the largest compromises of confidential information in the history of the United States.” After the prosecutor’s presentation, Assange’s attorney, Mark Summers, seated at the same table, called the charges “an outrageous and full-frontal assault on journalistic rights.”

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British Home Secretary signs extradition order to send Julian Assange to US

13 June 2019 — RT

Britain’s Home Secretary has revealed he has signed a request for the extradition of WikiLeaks co-founder Julian Assange to the US, where he is accused of violating the Espionage Act.

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s Today program, Sajid Javid said that he signed and certified the papers on Wednesday, with the order going before the UK courts on Friday.

He’s rightly behind bars. There’s an extradition request from the US that is before the courts tomorrow but yesterday I signed the extradition order and certified it and that will be going in front of the courts tomorrow.

Assange to Extradition Court: ‘I Won’t Surrender to the US for Doing Journalism’

2 May, 2019 — Consortium News

The WikiLeaks founder appeared via video link in Westminster Magistrates Court for the first hearing in what could be a lengthy process in the US request for extradition.

By Joe Lauria
Special to Consortium News

Julian Assange had his first day in court on Thursday in his fight against extradition to the United States in an historic press freedom case that could have a profound impact on the future of journalism.

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Why Opposing Julian Assange’s Extradition to the U.S. Matters for London and the U.K

25 March 2019 — Defend Wikileaks

Briefing for the London Assembly

Click here to read the PDF version

Summary

The Trump Administration has confirmed that the US government has charged WikiLeaks’ publisher Julian Assange and that it seeks his extradition from the UK.[i]  In the US, he faces life in prison. The case raises important issues for the London Assembly.

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FAIR TV: Terror Alerts and the NSA, Snowden's Asylum, Covering Weiner By Peter Hart

10 August 2013 — FAIR Blog

The media are using the government’s warnings about a terror attack to boost NSA surveillance. Plus media get mad about Russia’s decision to grant whistleblower Edward Snowden temporary asylum. But what’s the U.S. record on extradition? Plus ABC covers the Anthony Weiner campaign–and can’t much figure out why they’re doing so. Watch it all on this week’s FAIR TV:  Continue reading

Snowden's Asylum and Double Standards By Peter Hart

2 August 2013 — FAIR Blog

usat-snowdenNSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has been granted temporary asylum by Russia, which has generated coverage focusing on the U.S. outrage at Russia’s decision. “Defiant Russia Grants Snowden Year’s Asylum” is the headline at the New York Times (8/2/13), where readers were told of the “risk of a breach in relations with the United States” and that the Russian move “infuriated American officials.”

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