Your Man in the Public Gallery – Assange Hearing Day Four

28 February 2020 — Craig Murray

Please try this experiment for me.

Try asking this question out loud, in a tone of intellectual interest and engagement: “Are you suggesting that the two have the same effect?”.

Now try asking this question out loud, in a tone of hostility and incredulity bordering on sarcasm: “Are you suggesting that the two have the same effect?”.

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Julian Assange, the Glass Cage and Heaven in a Rage: Day Four of Extradition Hearings

28 February 2020 — Counter Currents

Thursday, February 27, Woolwich Crown Court.  The first round of extradition hearings regarding Julian Assange’s case concluded a day early, to recommence on May 18th.  It ended on an insensible note very much in keeping with the woolly-headed reasoning of Judge Vanessa Baraitser, who is of the view that a WikiLeaks publisher in a cage does not put all heaven in a rage.  On Wednesday, Assange’s defence had requested whether he would be able to leave the confines of his glass cage and join his legal team. As Assange had explained in response to his nodding off during proceedings, “I cannot meaningfully communicate with my lawyers.”  There was little point in “asking” if he could follow proceedings without enabling his participation.

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Julian Assange: British justice in the dock

28 February 2020 — True Publica

Assange: British justice in the dock

By TruePublica Editor: Anyone following this case will know that justice is not the intention of the British state when it comes to Julian Assange and his impending extradition to the United States. What we are witnessing, if you can call it that – is the operation of a kangaroo court. This type of court is a court that ignores recognised standards of law or justice. The defendants in such courts are often denied access to legal representation and, in some cases, proper defence whilst prejudicial bias is a constant. Such proceedings are often held to give the appearance of a fair and just trial, even though the verdict is already decided before the trial actually begins. These are the conditions of one of the most important court cases currently underway in British legal history.

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USA v Julian Assange: Extradition Day 4

27 February 2020 — Defend Wikileaks

Judge denies Assange’s request to sit with his lawyers

First week of hearings ends early; to return in earnest May 18th

The first week of Julian Assange’s extradition hearing at Woolwich Crown Court has ended a day earlier than expected, with District Judge Vanessa Baraitser denying Julian Assange’s request to leave the glassed box known as a secure dock in the back of the courtroom.

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USA v Julian Assange Extradition Hearing

23 February 2020 — Defend Wikileaks

When:

Part 1: 24th February -28th February
Part 2: 18th May – 5th June

Where:

Woolwich Crown Court/Belmarsh Magistrate’s Court, which is adjacent to HMP Belmarsh (See end of this briefing for travel advice)

Magistrate:

Vanessa Baraitser

Defence team:

Solicitor Gareth Peirce (Birnberg, Peirce & Partners); lead Barristers Edward Fitzgerald QC, Doughty Street Chambers, Mark Summers QC, Matrix Chambers


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Julian Assange News Links 22 February 2020

22 February 2020 — The New Dark Age

There may be some duplication due to cross-posting and may be updated throughout the day, so please check back

Bid to free Manning launched as explosive new evidence threatens to end Assange extradition
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheCanary/~3/uFnKO20SN7o/

Demonstration to free Julian Assange this Monday in Montreal
http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2020/02/22/mont-f22.html

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Assange’s Indictment on Political Offense Runs Counter to Extradition Treaty

20 February, 2020 — Consortium News

The WikiLeaks publisher was indicted for a political offense, writes Marjorie Cohn, which is forbidden by the two-nation treaty.

Assange being forced out of embassy, April 11, 2019. (YouTube)Julian Assange getting dragged out of Ecuadorian embassy, April 11, 2019. (YouTube)

 

By Marjorie Cohn
Truthout

The Trump administration is seeking extradition of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to the United States for trial on charges carrying 175 years in prison. On Feb. 24, a court in the U.K. will hold a hearing to determine whether to grant President Donald Trump’s request. The treaty between the U.S. and the U.K. prohibits extradition for a “political offense.” Assange was indicted for exposing U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan. That is a classic political offense. Moreover, Assange’s extradition would violate the legal prohibition against sending a person to a country where he is in danger of being tortured.
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The Coming Show Trial of Julian Assange by Chris Hedges

18 June 2019 — Truthdig

On Friday morning I was in a small courtroom at Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London. Julian Assange, held in Belmarsh Prison and dressed in a pale-blue prison shirt, appeared on a video screen directly in front of me. Assange, his gray hair and beard neatly trimmed, slipped on heavy, dark-frame glasses at the start of the proceedings. He listened intently as Ben Brandon, the prosecutor, seated at a narrow wooden table, listed the crimes he allegedly had committed and called for his extradition to the United States to face charges that could result in a sentence of 175 years. The charges include the release of unredacted classified material that posed a “grave” threat to “human intelligence sources” and “the largest compromises of confidential information in the history of the United States.” After the prosecutor’s presentation, Assange’s attorney, Mark Summers, seated at the same table, called the charges “an outrageous and full-frontal assault on journalistic rights.”

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