IRR News (22 November – 5 December 2018)

6 December 2018 — Institute of Race Relations

Weekly digest – Against Racism, for Social Justice

As we wait for the jury at Chelmsford Crown Court to deliver a verdict in the Stansted 15 trial, IRR News reports on the worrying escalation in ‘crimes of solidarity’ this year. Liz Fekete and Anya Edmond-Pettitt cover investigations and prosecutions brought against 99 people, not only anti-deportation activists, but the captains and crews of search and rescue NGOs, amongst others. The Stansted 15, as is by now well known, were attempting to stop sixty people from being deported via charter flight. Charter flight deportations form part of the UK’s border regime, which is explained in a new book by Corporate Watch, The UK Border Regime: a critical guide, reviewed here by Frances Webber.

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A World First In Citizen Surveillance By The State

6 December 2018 — True Publica

By TruePublica: Last month TruePublica reported that the British government were going full Orwellian and was now aiming to create a biometric database on top of its mass data bulk collection through surveillance systems that have been deemed illegal by the highest courts in the UK and EU. However, in Australia – a member of the Five-Eyes surveillance clan, the law is being changed to take us one step closer to the complete eradication of privacy.

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The Guardian attack on Assange exposed as politically-motivated fabrication By James Cogan

6 December 2018 — WSWS

Last week’s sensationalist allegation by the Guardian newspaper, that WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange met with Paul Manafort, American political lobbyist and one-time campaign manager for Donald Trump, has been exposed as a politically-motivated tissue of lies.

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Top Ecuadorian Diplomat Destroys Guardian’s Claim that Manafort Visited Assange

3 December2018 —  Zero Hedge

A former consul and first secretary at the Ecuadorian embassy in London has put the final nail in the coffin of credibility for The Guardian, refuting the paper’s fantastical and wholly unsupported claim that former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort visited WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in 2013, 2015 and the spring of 2016 – a charge vehemently denied by all parties involved.

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Is China Really More “Dystopian” Than The UK? By Andrew KORYBKO

4 December 2018 — Oriental Review

RT reported that the UK’s so-called “National Data Analytics Solution” will see an algorithm process whichever of 30 separate data points have been recorded about a person in local and national police databases in order to predict which members of the population are most likely to commit a crime or be victimized by one, after which the state will dispatch local health and social workers to offer “counseling” to them in an attempt to prevent the computer’s envisioned scenario from transpiring. This program is being likened to the 2002 film “Minority Report” and carries with it a vibe of China’s controversial “social credit” system, albeit without any “rewards” being offered for law-abiding behavior. In fact, one can actually make the claim that instead of the UK copying China to a degree, it was actually China that learned from the UK seeing as how the island nation’s mass surveillance system used to be far ahead of the communist nation’s one.

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Guardian newspaper spearheads new accusations against Assange and WikiLeaks By James Cogan

28 November 2018 — WSWS

The Guardian has stepped up its contemptible role as one of the main media conduits for the persecution of Julian Assange, publishing unsubstantiated and sensationalist allegations that the WikiLeaks publisher met with American political lobbyist, Paul Manafort.

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What the Stansted 15 Tells Us About Law and Order in Britain

23 November 2018 — True Publica

What the Stansted 15 Tells Us About Law and Order in Britain
By TruePublica: Back in September, three environmental activists were the first people in Britain since 1932 to receive jail sentences for non-violent anti-fracking protest in the UK. An appeal was lodged and public outrage caused a new judge to declare that the original ruling was ‘excessive”. This excessive use of the law is being used again in another case, which has more serious consequences.
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A secret court reverses the British government’s decision to make two men stateless

22 November 2018 — The Canary

A secret court declared the stripping of British citizenship to be unlawful in two cases on 15 November. The decision by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC) was officially made public on 19 November and represents a rare glimmer of hope in citizenship-stripping cases.

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Trump Claims He Knows “Nothing” About the Julian Assange He Cited Hundreds of Times During in His Campaign By Whitney Webb

22 November 2018 — Mintpress

Footage of Trump mentioning WikiLeaks and its releases over 140 times in October 2016 alone has since resurfaced, suggesting that Trump’s recent claims of ignorance in regard to Assange and WikiLeaks are insincere at best.

President Donald Trump told a reporter outside the White House on Tuesday that he doesn’t “know anything” about WikiLeaks founder and former editor Julian Assange, whose political asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy in London is believed to be under threat largely from pressure by the U.S. government.

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Assange’s Persecution Highlights Dangers to the Freedom of Speech and Free Media By Philip M. Giraldi

22 November 2018 — Strategic Culture Foundation

If you are a journalist and you discover something that is clearly unethical, and possibly even illegal, and you choose to report it what happens next? Well, you could win a Pulitzer Prize or, on the other hand, you might wind up hiding in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London for six years.

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State control and repression of dissent in Britain through legislation and policing methods By Sarah Pickard

21 November 2018 — Open Democracy

There has been a move towards tougher legislation, ambiguous terminology, lower thresholds and legislation allowing police greater rights, together with an escalation of militaristic forms of policing in recent years.

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Sarah Pickard, National Union of Students march, London, 2012. All rights reserved.

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