British Workers By Tony Norfield

22 October 2019 — Economics of Imperialism

As we wait impatiently while the Brits go through the interminable travail of Brexit, let us have a look at who they are. Not directly in a social, cultural or political sense, but by reviewing the data on UK employment. Work gives a foundation for people’s daily lives and will, in turn, have an impact on society, culture and politics. The employment numbers challenge the conceptions of many, especially those with a narrow ‘industrial’ view of the British working class. They also highlight that a surprising number of people, for various reasons, are not working at all, and that UK residents originally from other European Union countries are more likely to be employed than indigenous Brits. Continue reading

Workers of the World Unite (At Last) By Ronaldo Munck

26 April 2019 — Great Transition Initiative

Once seen as the vanguard of a new social order, the contemporary labor movement has been written off by many progressive activists and scholars as a relic of the past. They should not be so hasty. Rather than spelling the beginning of the end for organized labor, globalization has brought new opportunities for reinvention, and a sea change in both trade unions and the wider labor movement. Most notably, globalization has forced unions to think and act outside the state to build transnational solidarity across countries and sectors. Emerging transnational unionism, if it perseveres, contains the seeds of a new global movement, a new international that extends beyond labor to embrace all forces working toward a Great Transition.

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