A People’s History of Struggle: Liberty or Lockdown

25 February 2021 — Off Guardian 

Colin Todhunter

UK health minister Matt Hancock has warned the government’s timeline for unlocking coronavirus restrictions could be slowed as ministers remain “vigilant” against infection rates.

What began in March 2020 as a three-week lockdown to ‘save the NHS’ has turned into a year-long clampdown on fundamental liberties with the spectre of freedom through vaccination (‘COVID status certificates’) and the eventual rollout of all-encompassing digital IDs on the horizon.

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Bill Gates’ plans for our food systems will hurt Africa

25 February 2021  — USRTK

Food movements across Africa and hundreds of groups around the world are protesting Gates Foundation’s plans to transform African food systems. They say Gates’ efforts to push chemical-intensive industrial agriculture in Africa are harming, not helping, small farmers, communities and the climate.

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The Pine-eyed Boy Escapes from the Belly of the Dark Night in the Fish’s Tale

24 February, 2021 — Edward Curtin

It’s hard to say where things begin, but they do, as do we, and we are somehow in them and they in us, and a story begins.

Then the story gets silently disclosed as we live it, even though most of us don’t tell it until later, if we can find our tongues.  But when we tell it we are in another story, often nostalgic for the future but finding the creative past pulling us back down and deep to illuminate the present.

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COVID 19: the Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Profitable)

24 February 2021 — theplanningmotivedotcom

We have passed through the epicentre of the pandemic and the trailing winds are subsiding. Time to take stock. This article compares the contrasting impact of the pandemic in the USA to India. It is the follow up to an article first presented in May last year titled “Reversing the Lockdown”. https://theplanningmotivedotcom.files.wordpress.com/2020/05/reversing-lockdown-pdf.pdf 

virus-good-bad-ugly.pdf

Bill Gates, Climate Warrior – and Super Emitter

17 February 2021 — GMWatch

“When will the media realize that with Gates you have to follow the money?” – journalist Tim Schwab

Bill Gates has a new book out: How to Avoid a Climate Disaster. But some people are less than amused at having to take lessons on the climate crisis from a billionaire who, in the words of the ETC Group, “made a fortune skirting government regulations with monopolistic practices, and holds a significant financial stake in the continued expansion of the fossil fuel industry.”

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Post-Pandemic Landscapes: Behaviour Modification as the New Consensus Reality

September-October 2020 — New Dawn

The ‘COVID Event’ handed the unreal world its great coup over the place of the real. This perception intervention gave the final stimulus necessary to tip the twenty-first century into an awaiting technologically manipulated reality. A new landscape is emerging where, for the first time, the human mind is finding itself out-of-place within its own territory. Emerging ‘post-pandemic’ landscapes are likely to be hazardous territory for our mental, emotional and physical states. The human condition is under modification.

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Bitcoin hits $50,000, the 10-year yield hits 1.3%

17 February 2021 — theplanningmotivedotcom

It is not commonplace for the bourgeois or financial media to provide an insightful article into the workings of the capitalist economy. The modern version of the invisible hand would be the self-driving economy, and we know that such an economy is a car crash waiting to happen. The value of the Financial Times article is that it deals with just such an event, literally the canary flying in front of the car startling its optics. https://www.ft.com/content/16a37710- cbff-41b1-af96-7dc8b2de0c43 by Rana Foroohar 14th February. 

Quoting Luke Gromen in his newsletter Tree Rings she shares his comment that Bitcoin is not so much a bubble as the last functioning fire alarm warning of large geopolitical changes ahead. By this Mr Gromen means a diminished role for the US economy and particularly the Dollar in the future. Ms Foroohar agrees with this prognosis, declaring that the activity or should we say generosity of central bankers over the last 10 years has quashed price discovery. By this she means asset prices no longer provide a sense of the health of the underlying economy nor its indebtedness.

bitcoin-at-50000.pdf

EU/Germany parting of the ways?

12 February, 2021 — The Saker

By Francis Lee for the Saker Blog

From its inception the European Union was an ambitious strategy to build an economic bloc which would serve as a counter-weight to the US’s global economic dominance. (1) One of the primary conditions of this overall construction involved the creation of a single strong currency, the euro, that could become the rival to the US$. This was not just a political question, it also involved financial, economic and possibly even geopolitical dimensions. The Germans in particular were involved in the EU blueprint ever since the initial Treaty of Rome or EEC Treaty, as it was called, brought about the creation of the European Economic Community (the EEC). The treaty was signed on 25 March 1957 by Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and (West) Germany, and it came into force on 1 January 1958. At the outset Germany was on board the launch and prepared to give up her much beloved Deutschmark (DM) in order to eventually adopt the euro. A European super-state was envisioned complete with its own currency and act as a counterweight to the US Leviathan.
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Lithium, Batteries and Climate Change

11 February 2021 — Origin: Climate & Capitalism

Free Book Download

The transition to green energy does not have to be powered by destructive and poisonous mineral extraction.

Lithium mine in Bolivia


Jonathan Neale’s new book, Fight the Fire, is published by The Ecologist magazine, Resistance Books, the Alternative Information and Development Centre, and the International Institute for Research and Education. For a free copy, click the cover image.


Click to download free pdf or ebook.

by Jonathan Neale

I have spent the last year working on a book called Fight the Fire: Green New Deals and Global Climate Jobs. Most of it is about both the politics and the engineering of any possible transition that can avert catastrophic climate breakdown. One thing I had to think about long and hard was lithium and car batteries.

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The Invincible Green Stick of Happiness

6 February 2021 — Edward Curtin

Tolstoy’s grave on the edge of the ravine at his estate Yasnaya Polyana
“Ясная поляна, могила Л.Н. Толстого 2” by Alexxx1979 is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

After a night of haunting dreams that flowed as if they were written like running water, written on air, as the Roman poet Catullus once said, in the depth of a dark winter morning, I decided that I would take a walk in the afternoon, hoping that the sun would then appear, and it did, so I went walking toward the woods through deep white new-fallen snow all around me and entered a path into the woods across from my house that led toward a deep ravine below which were deep dark caves that once sheltered runaway slaves searching for the happiness of freedom, and I thought of them as I poked under the snow on the odd chance that I might find the green stick of happiness that Leo Tolstoy’s beloved brother, ten-year-old Nikolai, had once told the five-year-old Leo was buried by a ravine on the edge of the forest, a stick upon which were written the secret words that would bring love, peace, and happiness to everyone, and would do away with death, for their mother had died three years earlier and their father would die four years later, but I saw nothing and continued deeper into the forest to try to shed a sad feeling from a lock-down that had brought my spirits low as I tried to understand why so many people I knew were so enslaved, their minds forged in manacles, and how sad and dispirited it made me knowing that they were locked away from me in some conventional reality sold to them by liars, but perhaps you like the word depressed and you can use it if you want, but all I know is that the spirit of happiness had escaped me as I trudged deeper into the forest between the high pine trees until the trail I walked was intersected by another and a man met me there, as if he knew I was coming, a man with a long white beard and piercing eyes and we nodded and then he continued beside me and asked me what I was looking for, which startled me, and I was speechless and he said he’s been through here many times, especially by the ravine, and Leo told me he never could find the green stick of happiness his brother once told him was buried there but he was not giving up, he never would do that since he loved his brother who would never lie, he knew the stick existed and that’s why he himself was buried there, and he told me to continue seeking, because the stick was real and yes, those slaves knew it and were in that ravine for a reason, so we walked on as a man approached us who said his name was Albert, and I said Camus, and he said yes, let’s walk together guys, for these woods are dark and deep I know, but look up at the sky, the clouds have parted and the sparkling sky is speaking to us, right Leo, who said yes, I remember when Andrei in my book War and Peace lay wounded on the battlefield and looked at the sky, I wrote that he realized then that that lofty sky was infinite and that happiness was possible, that especially in the midst of battle you have to look up and realize that, that there are deeper reasons for things and petty concerns shield the spirit of truth and that even in the midst of war you can glimpse that reality, and it sounded good, I had heard their spiels before, or had read them to be accurate, they were great writers but this was my life and I couldn’t live in their books, but I wasn’t reading, I was walking, or was I dreaming, and then we came to the end of the path leading out of the woods and the sky opened out from the vast tree cover and they were gone and I was all alone again as usual, dispirited and heading back home on the road by the lake when I looked up at the sparkling blue sky and light that radiated off the snowy frozen lake and rose back to the sky in columns of undulating glory and felt the sun that had warmed the day and heard birds in the trees and was overwhelmed with a rush of happiness I can’t describe but it was not a dream and I walked in joy for a few minutes, knowing I had found the stick and that in the depth of winter, as Albert said, I had finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer, but that it came and went like running water, like flowing air, but it was enough for now.

  Albert Camus with his best friend Michel Gallimard, both of whom died from a car crash on  4 January 1960. On the right is Jeannine, Michel’s wife, who survived the crash.
“Albert Camus, Michel y Jeannine Gallimard” by Antonio Marín Segovia is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0