As In Serbia And Elsewhere, U.S. And NATO Target Media In Libya

31 July 2011 — All Voices

As in Serbia and elsewhere NATO and U.S. target media in Libya

When Gadaffi targets journalists it is a crime as suggested in this article.

But when NATO intervenes and bombs media outlets killing journalists there is little outrage. Libya has reported that three journalists were killed in a NATO air strike on state television.

This is not the first time that NATO and the U.S. have targeted journalists and media outlets. Other incidents included the deliberate targeting of journalists in occupied territories in the Middle East, the NATO bombardment of Radio Television Serbia (RTS) in Belgrade in 1999 and the American army bombing in Kabul and Baghdad of Al Jazeera television.

Khaled Basilia director of the stations attacked said;Three of our colleagues were murdered and 15 injured while performing their professional duty as Libyan journalists,’ Basilia branded the strike ‘an act of international terrorism and in violation of UN Security Council resolutions.’ Of course this language is not to be used against the good guys on a humanitarian mission. No doubt this is all done to save the lives of innocent civilians. The NATO language if anything is even more Orwellian.

NATO said it struck three television transmitters to silence ‘terror broadcasts’ by Moamer Gadaffi’s regime The statement went on:’NATO conducted a precision air strike that disabled three ground-based Libyan state TV satellite transmission dishes in Tripoli… with the intent of degrading Kadhafi?s use of satellite television as a means to intimidate the Libyan people and incite acts of violence against them,’ I call this the Demon Principle. Acts that are normally regarded as against international humanitarian law are justified by the Demon Principle. Everyone associated with the demon becomes a legitimate target. This is somewhat of a mirror image of what AL Qaeda and Breivik reason and use to target people who any less biased observer would find to be protected from attack. Terrorists considers us all as targets as supporting the regimes that attack international terrorism or in Breiviks case support imperialist cultural marxism. While NATO does not extend the principle to all those under Gadaffi’s rule it applies to anyone obviously supporting that rule.

Basilia noted that the channel posed no threat to civilians. ‘We are not a military target, we are not commanders in the army and we do not pose threat to civilians,’ ‘We are performing our job as journalists representing what we wholeheartedly believe is the reality of NATO’s aggression and the violence in Libya.’ Of course this will be simply written off as propaganda but even propaganda is not regarded as a sufficient grounds for targeting news media under international humanitarian law. Perhaps NATO just does not like the reports of collateral damage such as occured with the recent bombing by NATO of a hospital.