Media Lens: The Filter Bubble – Owen Jones And Con Coughlin

14 November 2018 — Media Lens

There is something dreamlike about the system of mass communication sometimes described as ‘mainstream media’. The self-described ‘rogue journalist’ and ‘guerrilla poet’ Caitlin Johnstone tweeted it well:

‘The Iraq invasion feels kind of like if your dad had stood up at the dinner table, cut off your sister’s head in front of everyone, gone right back to eating and never suffered any consequences, and everyone just kind of forgot about it and carried on life like it never happened.’

Continue reading

For WaPo, ‘What Next in Africa?’ Doesn’t Include US Getting Out By Gunar Olsen

26 March 2018 — FAIR

Washington Post: Pentagon grapples with a thorny question after Niger ambush: What next in Africa?

The Washington Post (3/19/18) thinks the question is thorny, so it makes sure to prune the answers.

“Pentagon Grapples With a Thorny Question After Niger Ambush,” a recent Washington Post headline (3/19/18) read: “What Next in Africa?”

Among the possible answers not considered by the Post article: “Close US military bases,” “End US drone strikes” or “Stop US special forces raids.”

Continue reading

On the Beach 2017 – The Beckoning of Nuclear War By John Pilger

4 August 2017 — John Pilger

On the beach

The US submarine captain says, “We’ve all got to die one day, some sooner and some later. The trouble always has been that you’re never ready, because you don’t know when it’s coming. Well, now we do know and there’s nothing to be done about it.”

He says he will be dead by September. It will take about a week to die, though no one can be sure. Animals live the longest.

Continue reading

UK Elections: Corbyn or May? Selected Articles

5 June 2017 — Global Research

The general election in the UK is due on Thursday, June 8. Apparently, a series of “terrorist” attacks garnered attention not just domestically but more so internationally. Are these purported “terrorist” attacks part of a bigger political agenda? Read the insightful articles below to gain perspective.

“We are now days away from one of the most important elections for decades, with Jeremy Corbyn rapidly closing the poll gap between himself and May, and the BBC, ITV News, Sky News and Channel 4 News are choosing not to tell the British voting public that the Tory leader oversaw, and (necessarily) approved, the withdrawing of terrorist control orders for known Jihadists in Manchester that they might travel freely between that city and Libya and so aid the UK government’s effort to overthrow Gaddafi.” (Alison Banville, 2017)

Continue reading

Terror in Britain: What Did the Prime Minister Know? By John Pilger

1 June 2017 — John Pilger

The unsayable in Britain’s general election campaign is this. The causes of the Manchester atrocity, in which 22 mostly young people were murdered by a jihadist, are being suppressed to protect the secrets of British foreign policy.

Critical questions – such as why the security service MI5 maintained terrorist “assets” in Manchester and why the government did not warn the public of the threat in their midst – remain unanswered, deflected by the promise of an internal “review”. Continue reading

Media Lens: Blowback – Manchester and the Libya Connection

1 June 2017 — Media Lens

In the wake of yet another horrendous atrocity, this time in Manchester claiming 23 lives, ‘respectable’ media once again refused to seriously discuss the extent to which violent attacks against ‘us’ are linked to ‘our’ violent attacks against ‘them’. Instead, howls of disgust typically arise when anyone mentions terms like ‘blowback’ and ‘reaping the whirlwind’. Continue reading

This week the issue is not Trump. It is ourselves By John Pilger

17 January 2017 — John Pilger

On the day President Trump is inaugurated, thousands of writers in the United States will express their indignation. “In order for us to heal and move forward…”, say Writers Resist, “we wish to bypass direct political discourse, in favour of an inspired focus on the future, and how we, as writers, can be a unifying force for the protection of democracy.”

And: “We urge local organizers and speakers to avoid using the names of politicians or adopting ‘anti’ language as the focus for their Writers Resist event. It’s important to ensure that nonprofit organizations, which are prohibited from political campaigning, will feel confident participating in and sponsoring these events.”

Thus, real protest is to be avoided, for it is not tax exempt.

Continue reading

Media Lens: The Great Libya War Fraud

3 October 2016 — Media Lens

National newspapers were ‘unimpressed by Jeremy Corbyn’s victory’ in the Labour leadership election, Roy Greenslade noted in the Guardian, surprising no-one. Corbyn secured almost 62% of the 506,000 votes cast, up from the 59% share he won in 2015, ‘with virtually no press backing whatsoever’.

In reality, of course, Corbyn did not just lack press backing. He won in the face of more than one year of relentless corporate media campaigning to politically, ethically, professionally, psychologically and even sartorially discredit him. That Corbyn survived is impressive. That he won again, increased his vote-share, and took Labour Party membership from 200,000 to more than 500,000, is astonishing.

Continue reading

Media Lens: Anatomy Of A Propaganda Blitz – Part 1

12 May 2016 — Media Lens

Anatomy Of A Propaganda Blitz – Part 1

We live in a time when state-corporate interests are cooperating to produce propaganda blitzes intended to raise public support for the demonisation and destruction of establishment enemies.

Below, we will examine five key components of an effective propaganda campaign of this kind.

Continue reading

Media Lens: Obama – The Art Of Ruin

27 January 2016 — Media Lens

Obama – The Art Of Ruin

In a revealing tweet last October, BBC diplomatic correspondent, Bridget Kendall, commented acerbically on a press conference given by Russian president Vladimir Putin:

‘… And he can’t resist bragging about his own experience going up in fighter jet’

We thought aloud on Twitter that we couldn’t recall any BBC journalist accusing Obama of ‘bragging’ about anything.

Continue reading

The UN Security Council Has Become A “Rubber Stamp” To Wage US-NATO’s Illegal Wars. Disastrous Results of UNSC “Military Authorizations” By Carla Stea

29 December 2015 — Global Research

The UN Security Council Has Become A “Rubber Stamp” To Wage US-NATO’s Illegal Wars. Disastrous Results of UNSC “Military Authorizations” By Carla Stea

The United Nations Security Council:  An Organization for Injustice

Since 1991, and United Nations Security Council Resolution 678, which authorized the US-UK attack on Iraq, which, in the words of Marti Ahtissari  “destroyed the infrastructure necessary to support human life in Iraq,” the United Nations has been dragged into destructive “adventures” that have literally created the crises it is now trying to resolve. 

In 2011, the UN Security Council Resolution 1973 authorized NATO’s attack on Libya.  The attacks and sanctions in Iraq and Libya have so devastated both countries that it is impossible to resurrect a viable government in either country, and both remain incubators of terrorism which is spreading throughout the Middle East, Africa and beyond. Continue reading