Cyril Ramaphosa relaunches neo-liberalism By Prof. Patrick Bond

23 February 2018 — Pambazuka News

After Jacob Zuma’s firing, South Africa risks budget austerity and even renewed BRICS “poisoning”. 

Cyril Ramaphosa’s soft-coup firing of Jacob Zuma from the South African presidency on 14 February 2018, after nearly nine years in power and a bitter struggle to avoid resignation, has contradictory local and geopolitical implications. Amidst general applause at seeing Zuma’s rear end in the society, immediately concerns arise about the new president’s neo-liberal, pro-corporate tendencies, and indeed his legacy of financial corruption and class war against workers given the lack of closure on the 2012 Marikana Massacre.

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Remembering Bra Hugh Masekela

26 January 2018 — Jazz on the Tube

Hugh Masekela (April 4, 1939 – January 23, 2018)

Hugh Masekela “Grazing In The Grass” live at the Kuumbwa, March 24th, 2014

I had the pleasure, and the honour of hanging out with Bra Hugh on a number of occasions when I lived Johannesburg as well as here in London when he visited here. A modest and honest human being, who was the same offstage as we was on, and who dedicated his life, not only to the wonderful music of South Africa but to the struggle to free its people from the evil of Apartheid.

As they say  in SA, Hamba Kahle Bra Hugh, you are forever in our memory Continue reading

South Africa’s ANC’s “Internal Presidential Elections”: Ramaphosa Rises as Lonmin Expires By Prof. Patrick Bond

20 December 2017

Workers, Women and Communities Prepare to Fight, Not Mourn

Monday night’s internal African National Congress (ANC) presidential election of Cyril Ramaphosa – with a razor-thin 51% majority of nearly 4800 delegates – displaced but did not resolve a fight between two bitterly-opposed factions. On the one hand are powerful elements friendly to so-called “White Monopoly Capital,” and on the other are outgoing ANC president Jacob Zuma’s allies led by Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, his ex-wife and former African Union chairperson. The latter faction includes corrupt state “tenderpreneur” syndicates, especially the notorious Gupta brothers, and is hence typically nicknamed “Zupta.” (Zuma is still scheduled to serve as national president until mid-2019.)

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Marikana Massacre Hangs Over South Africa's New Extremely Rich ANC Leader

19 December 2017 — TRNN

After a tight race that exposed stark divisions within the party, the African National Congress elected Cyril Ramaphosa, an anti-apartheid crusader, business tycoon, and key suspect in the 2012 Marikana Massacre is positioned to be the country’s next president. But will he root out corruption, or is he part of the problem? (inc. transcript) Continue reading

How the People of South Africa were Misled and Can Rise Again By John Pilger

23 November 2017 — John Pilger

Returning to South Africa, John Pilger delivers an inaugural lecture in Cape Town in memory of the anti-apartheid campaigner, Abdulhay Ahmed Saloojee. He asks why the struggle for freedom has yet to be won, why a form of apartheid still rules and why this oppression has become a model for much of the world in the 21st century.

WATCH THE LECTURE

You can also watch John Pilger’s 1999 film Apartheid Did Not Die on his website.

In South Africa’s fight between hostile brothers – the “Zuptas” and “White Monopoly Capital” – a new consensus appears By Patrick Bond

5 October 2017 — Pambazuka News

Former Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan and super-consultant Iraj Abedian, two solid bourgeouis representatives, have made an unusually passionate case against what is sometimes termed White Monopoly Capital. Th[i]s surprising breakthrough indicates that corporate-state degeneracy is now so extreme, that the truth will out.

Last week a conceptual barrier carefully constructed by elites since 2015 was suddenly cracked at the University of the Witwatersrand Great Hall by two of South Africa’s leading economic personalities: Pravin Gordhan, who served as a pro-business Finance Minister for seven years until being fired in March, and super-consultant Iraj Abedian, who in 1996 had co-authored the country’s post-apartheid homegrown structural adjustment programme. Two more solid bourgeois representatives would be hard to find.

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BRICS: Weakening US Hegemony, Reshaping the Global Economy?

3 September 2017 — Global Research

In light of the ninth BRICS summit which will be held in Xiamen, China on September 4 and 5, Global Research brings to your attention some articles on the framework and roadmap of the BRICS partnership. 

Will the US empire break the on-going strategic relations between the concerned countries? Or will the BRICS partnership weaken US hegemony and lead the world into a peaceful economic development?

Read our selected articles below.

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The Vela Incident: South Atlantic Mystery Flash in September 1979 Raised Questions about Nuclear Test

8 December 2016 — National Security Archive

CIA Panel Found Evidence “Consistent” with a “Nuclear Explosion in Outer Space” But White House Board Later Disagreed

  • Critics Labeled White House Report a “Whitewash”
  • New Declassified Records Deepen the Debate on the 22 September 1979 Event – Including Whether Israel and South Africa Were Involved

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 570

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Video: The Giant Is Falling Official Trailer 2016

10 October 2016 — Youtube

The Giant is Falling takes us through the big political events of recent years that signify the dying days of the ANC in South Africa. Locating the moment when things fell apart as the Marikana Massacre, the film charts the various ways people have collectively responded to the ANC’s failure to deliver on its promises. From the end of the ANC’s special relationship with the trade unions, to the #FeesMustFall student movement, to the more recent crushing electoral losses at the polls for the party of liberation, the film picks at the festering sore of inequality that is making the current status quo untenable.

#TheGiantIsFalling

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South Africa: Exploding with Rage, Imploding with Self-Doubt—but Exuding Socialist Potential by Patrick Bond

29 October 2015 — Monthly Review

South Africa: Exploding with Rage, Imploding with Self-Doubt—but Exuding Socialist Potential by

Patrick Bond is director of the University of KwaZulu-Natal Centre for Civil Society and is an advisory board member of Numsa’s Research and Policy Institute. The opinions expressed in this article are his own.

The fast-reviving South African left is urgently coming to grips with the most acute national crises of structure and agency the country has experienced since the historic freeing of Nelson Mandela in February 1990 and the shift of the entire body politic in favor of the African National Congress (ANC) and the South African Communist Party (SACP). At that time, the ANC soon took control of the country’s progressive forces, winning mass social hegemony, vanquishing other liberation tendencies (Pan-Africanism and Black Consciousness), and dissolving the anti-apartheid United Democratic Front (UDF) that civil society activists founded a decade earlier. It then negotiated the first democratic election, which it won handily in April 1994 under Nelson Mandela’s leadership. Afrikaner state managers and corporate titans, as well as multilateral agencies and other forces of imperialism, demanded from the ANC an elite transition that opened both the macro- and microeconomies. Property rights were granted maximum protection, even though whites had acquired the bulk of those through what is widely termed a crime against humanity: apartheid. Read the rest of the article HERE.