Video: Matt Damon channels Howard Zinn – “The problem is civil obedience.”

 1 December 2013 — Greanville Post

We’re mighty glad that Damon, a very decent man and a thinker, even if deeply embedded in the Hollywood miasma, took it upon himself to make this video. Fact is, Howard Zinn and other radicals had been saying this for decades, (Zinn gave this speech in 1970), reaching a puny audience. But it took Damon just 24 hours for the video to go viral. Well, we hope it ain’t too late. Continue reading

Video: Matt Damon channels Howard Zinn – "The problem is civil obedience."

 1 December 2013 — Greanville Post

We’re mighty glad that Damon, a very decent man and a thinker, even if deeply embedded in the Hollywood miasma, took it upon himself to make this video. Fact is, Howard Zinn and other radicals had been saying this for decades, (Zinn gave this speech in 1970), reaching a puny audience. But it took Damon just 24 hours for the video to go viral. Well, we hope it ain’t too late. Continue reading

Information Clearing House Newsletter 3 August, 2010: Let Them Eat Wedding Cake

3 August, 2010 — Information Clearing House

Pakistan No Obedient Ally
By Eric Margolis
WikiLeaks data shows how volatile nation is forced to act against own self interests.
www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26070.htm

The CIA & The ISI: More In Common Than We Think?
By Nida Khan
Drones Kill 12 Children Playing Outside’ – ‘A Family Buries 15’ – ‘Americans Target the Wrong House Again’. Virtually every morning on the streets of Karachi, Pakistan, these sorts of headlines gleamed across the front pages of major papers, led the evening news broadcasts and drove conversations around dinner tables in both elite and impoverished households alike.
www.informationclearinghouse.info/article26069.htm

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Howard Zinn: You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train (2004)

7 February, 2010

Documentary in which professor Howard Zinn recounts his life as a writer, educator, and leader in nonviolent social protest. His story is one of being in “the right place at the right time,” from poor beginnings, working in shipyard unions, fighting in WWII as a bomber pilot, and then launching his academic career as one of the first white professors to teach at the historically black Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. He helped spark the civil rights protest there, and soon moved to Boston College where he became a key figure in organizing anti-Vietnam protests. The historical span of the film concludes with Zinn protesting the war on Iraq. The documentary captures a year in Zinn’s life, including his winning of the 2003 Prix des Amis du Monde diplomatique. Testimonials from the likes of Alice Walker (a student of Zinn’s at Spelman) and Noam Chomsky put his contributions to the peace and civil rights movements in a broader perspective. Matt Damon narrates and the score includes songs by Woody Guthrie, Billy Bragg, and Eddie Vedder.

http://widgets.vodpod.com/w/video_embed/Groupvideo.4688887

Anti-Empire Report No.78 By William Blum – Zinn, Haiti, Aristide, and ideology

6 February, 2010 — The Anti-Empire Report

“In America you can say anything you want — as long as it doesn’t have any effect.” – Paul Goodman

Progressive activists and writers continually bemoan the fact that the news they generate and the opinions they express are consistently ignored by the mainstream media, and thus kept from the masses of the American people. This disregard of progressive thought is tantamount to a definition of the mainstream media. It doesn’t have to be a conspiracy; it’s a matter of who owns the mainstream media and the type of journalists they hire — men and women who would like to keep their jobs; so it’s more insidious than a conspiracy, it’s what’s built into the system, it’s how the system works. The disregard of the progressive world is of course not total; at times some of that world makes too good copy to ignore, and, on rare occasions, progressive ideas, when they threaten to become very popular, have to be countered.

So it was with Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States. Here’s Barry Gewen an editor at the New York Times Book Review, June 5, 2005 writing of Zinn’s book and others like it:

There was a unifying vision, but it was simplistic. Since the victims and losers were good, it followed that the winners were bad. From the point of view of downtrodden blacks, America was racist; from the point of view of oppressed workers, it was exploitative; from the point of view of conquered Hispanics and Indians, it was imperialistic. There was much to condemn in American history, little or nothing to praise. … Whereas the Europeans who arrived in the New World were genocidal predators, the Indians who were already there believed in sharing and hospitality (never mind the profound cultural differences that existed among them), and raped Africa was a continent overflowing with kindness and communalism (never mind the profound cultural differences that existed there).

One has to wonder whether Mr. Gewen thought that all the victims of the Holocaust were saintly and without profound cultural differences.

Prominent American historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. once said of Zinn: “I know he regards me as a dangerous reactionary. And I don’t take him very seriously. He’s a polemicist, not a historian.”

In the obituaries that followed Zinn’s death, this particular defamation was picked up around the world, from the New York Times, Washington Post, and the leading American wire services to the New Zealand Herald and Korea Times.

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Global Research 4 February, 2010: The Haitian Disaster and the Threat of War Selected Articles January 29 – 4 February, 2010

4 February, 2010 — Global Research

The Crisis in Haiti
Global Research Dossier of 50+ articles and reports
– 2010-02-15

Award Winning Movie: “SUPERPOWER”:
Order the DVD Online from Global Research
– by Barbara-Anne Steegmuller – 2010-02-15

US Intelligence Report Classifies Venezuela as Anti-US Leader
– by Eva Golinger – 2010-02-03

Petition: War is Illegal
Sign and show your support
– 2010-02-03

Canada Supreme Court – Omar Khadr’s Rights Violated
– by Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East – 2010-02-03

Bomb Kills Three US Marines in Pakistan
– 2010-02-03

The Pentagon Runs Amok
Obama is letting the generals and contractors roll over him
– by Dan Simpson – 2010-02-03

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Remembering Howard Zinn (1922 – 2010) By Stephen Lendman

1 February, 2010 — Mathaba.net

howard-zinn.jpgDistinguished scholar, author, political scientist, people`s historian, activist, and son of blue-collar immigrant parents, Zinn was born on August 24, 1922 in Brooklyn, New York and died in Santa Monica, CA of a reported heart attack while swimming on January 27. He’s survived by two children, Myla Kabat-Zinn and Jeff Zinn, and five grandchildren.

He was 87, and a valued guest several times on The Lendman News Hour and Progressive Radio News Hour. He’ll be sorely missed.

Writing in CounterPunch on January 28, journalist, author and activist Harvey Wasserman called him ‘above all a gentleman of unflagging grace, humility and compassion.’

Interviewed on Democracy Now, his former student, author Alice Walker, said ‘he had such a wonderful impact on my life and on the lives of the students of Spelman and of millions of people….he loved his students.’

On the same program, Noam Chomsky spoke about Zinn during the Vietnam war period saying:

His book, The Logic of Withdrawal ‘really broke through. He was the first person to say – loudly, publicly, very persuasively – that this simply has to stop; we should get out, period, no conditions; we have no right to be there; it’s an act of aggression; pull out.’

He ‘not only wrote about (it) eloquently, but he participated in’ anti-war efforts to end the war, for civil and worker rights, and ‘any significant action for peace and justice. Howard was there. People saw him as a leader, but he was really a participant. His remarkable character made him a leader….’

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Video: A People’s History of the American Empire by Howard Zinn

A People’s History of American Empire by Howard Zinn

Read by Matt Damon and Howard Zinn

Parts 2-53:

A People’s History of The US (The 20th Century) Howard Zinn (playlist)


http://widgets.vodpod.com/w/video_embed/Groupvideo.2808704

more about “A People’s History (The 20th Century)…“, posted with vodpod

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A People’s History of American Empire by Howard Zinn

HenryHolt
March 28, 2008

Empire or Humanity?
What the Classroom Didn’t Teach Me about the American Empire
by Howard Zinn
Narrated by Viggo Mortensen
Art by Mike Konopacki
Video editing by Eric Wold


http://widgets.vodpod.com/w/video_embed/Groupvideo.1378111

http://axisofjustice.org

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Wallace Shawn reads Howard Zinn

Anthony Arnove
January 28, 2008

Actor Wallace Shawn reads the speech of historian Howard Zinn given at Johns Hopkins University on Civil Disobedience, November 1970.

Part of a reading from Voices of a People’s History of the United States (Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove,) May 2, 2007 in New York, NY.


http://widgets.vodpod.com/w/video_embed/Groupvideo.2808556

Video – Zinn on class in America Pt. 1

Howard Zinn: In the United States we are brought up to think there’s only one class

Bio
Howard Zinn is an American historian, political scientist, social critic, activist and playwright. He is best known as author of the best-seller ‘A People’s History of the United States’. Zinn has been active in the Civil Rights and the anti-war movements in the United States. Zinn was raised in a working-class family in Brooklyn, and flew bombing missions for the United States in World War II, an experience he now points to in shaping his opposition to war. In 1956, he became a professor at Spelman College in Atlanta, a school for black women, where he soon became involved in the Civil rights movement, which he participated in as an adviser to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee SNCC and chronicled, in his book SNCC The New Abolitionists. Zinn collaborated with historian Staughton Lynd and mentored a young student named Alice Walker. When he was fired in 1963 for insubordination related to his protest work, he moved to Boston University, where he became a leading critic of the Vietnam War.

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