Silvia Federici: The exploitation of women and the development of capitalism

10 November, 2020 — Liberation School

By Jodi Dean

Silvia Federici’s Caliban and the Witch is a classic work of anti-capitalist feminism. The book examines capitalism’s investment in sexism and racism, showing how the consolidation of the capitalist system depended on the subjugation of women, the enslavement of black and indigenous people, and the exploitation of the colonies. Federici demonstrates that unpaid labor–especially that of women confined to the domestic sphere and of enslaved workers–is a necessary support for waged labor.

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Engels’ pause and the condition of the working class in England

15 March 2020 — Michael Roberts Blog

by michael roberts

On this day, 15 March 1845, Friedrich Engels published his masterpiece of social analysis, The Condition of the Working Class in England.  This year is the 200th anniversary of Engels’ birth.  Below is a short (rough) extract from my upcoming book on the contribution that Engels made to Marxian political economy.  

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A Certain Stage of Development

13 January 2020 — Anticapital

1. At a certain stage of development, the material productive forces of society come into conflict with the existing relations of production, or–this merely expresses the same thing in legal terms–with the property relations within the framework of which they have operated hitherto.  From forms of development of the productive forces, these relations turn into their fetter.  Then begins an era of social revolution.

And the era of social counterrevolution.

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The End of the road for capitalism or for us all? By William Bowles

13 January 2018 — InvestigatingImperialism

“…we have the certainty that matter remains eternally the same in all its transformations, that none of its attributes can ever be lost, and therefore, also, that with the same iron necessity that it will exterminate on the earth its highest creation, the thinking mind, it must somewhere else and at another time again produce it”. —
Frederick Engels, from the introduction to ‘The Dialectics of Nature’, 1883.

In 1945, following the second ‘war to end all wars’, or something like that, the people of Britain put their faith, at least temporally, in an alleged socialist, Labour government. A government that vowed that there would be no return to the ‘bad old days’ of prewar Britain. So we got the National Health Service, public housing, a nationalised transport system, even the canal network was nationalised (telecommunications was already a state-owned monopoly, the capitalists weren’t prepared to risk their capital in its development).

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Climate change: What would Frederick Engels say? By Martin O'Beirne

30 September 2013  — The Ecosocialist

We had not yet destabilised the climate and trounced other planetary ecological boundaries back in 1876 when Frederick Engels wrote these passages in his unfinished The part played by labour in the transition from ape to man. But it is clear that back then Engels had established a biophilous ethic, or in his words: Continue reading

The mega project and the end of marxism

13 May 2013 —  Left Streamed

The MEGA project and the end of Marxism

Editing the Classics – the unknown Marx and Engels MEGA – what’s in an acronym: Marx / Engels Complete Works. A Mega-Project – the largest historical critical edition project in the social sciences, more than a hundred scholars collaborating in 8 countries on 4 continents, a long-lasting project: started in the 1960s, will continue (after the recent evaluation) for at least another 10 years output: 164 volumes according to the original plan, still 114 volumes according to the revised plan of 1992. Continue reading

Video: Michael Lebowitz: 'Spectres and struggles': a new vision for socialism in the 21st century

3 May, 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal

This talk was presented in Zagreb, Croatia.

A spectre is haunting the working class of Europe (both east and west) and the working class of developed capitalism in general. That spectre is the spectre of communism. For the working class, that frightful hobgoblin is a society of little freedom, a society of workers without power (in the workplace or community) and a society where decisions are made at the top by a vanguard party which views itself as the sole repository of truth. Of course, this was not what communism meant for Karl Marx and Frederick Engels nor, indeed, for Lenin.

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A Return to Marx’s Ecological Critique By Simon Butler

9 April 2013 — Green Left Weekly

Karl_Marx_posing1.jpg

Do oil spills make good economic sense? A witness called by Canadian firm Enbridge Inc. – which wants approval to build a $6.5-billion pipeline linking Alberta’s tar sands with the Pacific coast – told a recent hearing in British Columbia (BC) that the answer is yes. He said oil spills could benefit the economy, giving business new opportunities to make money cleaning it up. He told Fishers Union representatives that an oil spill in BC might indeed kill the local fishing industry, but their lost income would be replaced by compensation payouts and new career prospects, such as working for oil cleanup crews.

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Two New Pamphlets on Farming and Darwin

2 June, 2009 – Socialist Voice has published two new pamphlets. The PDF files may be downloaded free.

LA VIA CAMPESINA: FARMERS NORTH AND SOUTH CONFRONT AGRIBUSINESS. by John Riddell and Adriana Paz. Around the world, farm income is plummeting, pushing farmers off the land and into destitution. Militant farmers and farmworkers are fighting back.

MARX, ENGELS, AND DARWIN. by Ian Angus. How Darwin’s theory of evolution confirmed and extended the most fundamental concepts of Marxism. Why Karl Marx described Darwin’s Origin of Species as “the book which contains the basis in natural history for our view.”