Death of South Africa’s Lonmin Mining House. “Murder by Money” By Prof. Patrick Bond

30 May 2019 — Global Research

Autopsy reveals the British-South African corpse’s poisoning by microfinance, ‘development finance’ and corporate finance

The death of the 110-year old mining house Lonmin at a London shareholders meeting on May 28 occurred not through bankruptcy or nationalisation, as would have been logical at various points in time. It was the result of a takeover – generally understood as a rip-off of investors and workers – by an extremely jejune (7 year-old) South African corporation, Sibanye-Stillwater. The latter’s chief executive, Neil Froneman, is known for extreme aggression in both corporate takeovers and workplace cost-cutting, with by far the highest fatality rate in the mining industry.

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Marikana Massacre Hangs Over South Africa's New Extremely Rich ANC Leader

19 December 2017 — TRNN

After a tight race that exposed stark divisions within the party, the African National Congress elected Cyril Ramaphosa, an anti-apartheid crusader, business tycoon, and key suspect in the 2012 Marikana Massacre is positioned to be the country’s next president. But will he root out corruption, or is he part of the problem? (inc. transcript) Continue reading

South Africa: Sectarian shame of the SACP By Terry Bell

16 August 2013 — Terry Bell

Shortly after the column below was written and blogged, the SA Communist Party issued its statement on Marikana that reveals the deep and dangerous sectarianism of this organisation. Here, I feel, is exposed one of the roots of the problem. I include here the final paragraph of that statement as an introduction to a repeat of the Inside Labour column that appeared here yesterday: Continue reading

Video: Platinum Miners and Class Struggle in South Africa By Patrick Bond

10 January 2013 — The Real News Network

 

Patrick Bond: Platinum miners strike inspires workers across <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>South <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Africa; Billionaire mine owner becomes deputy head of ANC

 

Bio

 

Patrick Bond is the Director of the Center for Civil Society and Professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal in <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>South <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Africa. Bond is the author and editor of the recently released books, Politics of <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Climate Justice and Durban’s <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Climate Gamble. (inc. transcript) Watch full multipart Platinum Miners and Class Struggle in South Africa Continue reading

South Africa: Politics, profits and policing after the Marikana Massacre By Patrick Bond

20 December 2012Links International journal of Socialist Renewal

Lover of fast cars, vintage wine, trout fishing and game farming and the second richest black businessperson in South Africa (global financial publication Forbes puts his wealth at $675 million or £416 million), Cyril Ramaphosa (left) celebrates his election as deputy president of the ANC with South Africa’s President Jacob Zuma. Ramaphosa demanded that police break the Marikana mineworkers’ strike; police massacred 34 mineworkers and wounded 78 others.

By Patrick Bond

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The Marikana Massacre and the South African State's Low Intensity War Against the People By Vishwas Satgar

5 September 2012 — The   B u l l e t • Socialist Project • E-Bulletin No. 693

The <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>massacre of the <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Marikana/<strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Lonmin workers has inserted itself within <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>South <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>Africa’s national consciousness, not so much through the analysis, commentary and reporting in its wake. Instead, it has been the power of the visual images of <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>police armed with awesome fire power gunning down these workers, together with images of bodies lying defeated and lifeless, that has aroused a national outcry and wave of condemnation. Continue reading

Ronnie Kasrils: Marikana – It was like poking a hornet's nest

26 August, 2012 — Sunday Times (South Africa) — Those in power say, don’t point fingers. But we need exactly that if we’re to learn from this, writes Ronnie Kasrils.

Our country reels with horror and shock at last week‘s Marikana shootings. There is disbelief around the world that this has happened in a democratic South Africa.

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Can't you hear the thunder? By Jay Naidoo

22 August 2012 01:09 — The Daily Maverick
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The headlines scream ‘Marikana Massacre’; ‘Killing Fields of Rustenburg’. Radio and TV Talk shows and social media all display the anger and expose the psyche of a nation badly wounded. The bloodiest security operation since the end of apartheid has left us shocked and asking what went wrong? The reality is, many things went wrong. Way too many things went wrong, for way too long now. 

Democratic Left Front: Justice now for the Marikana workers and community!

23 August, 2012 Democratic Left Front statement on the Marikana massacre

On August 16, 2012, post-apartheid democracy lurched into a horror. It was estimated 34 mineworkers at the Lonmin mine in the North West province were brutally gunned down by police, and in total over 70 workers have been injured. The death toll at this stage is still not completely verified, with the community still reporting loved ones missing and not accounted for in official body counts.

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Turmoil at South Africa’s Platinum Mines by Pratap Chatterjee

23 August 2012 — CorpWatch Blog

Cyril Ramaphosa photo courtesy Mining Weekly video. Rustenberg platinum processing plant courtesy bbcworldservice. Used under Creative Commons license

A third wildcat strike this year has closed yet another South African platinum mine less than a week after the police opened fire and killer 34 miners at the Lonmin mine north of Johannesburg. The latest to lay down tools are a thousand workers at the Royal Bafokeng Platinum Mine at Rasimone this Wednesday.

The strikes have hit the global supply of platinum, which is mostly used by the car manufacturing industry to make catalytic converters. Some 80 percent of the world’s supply of the precious metal is mined in South Africa.

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