Probing the depths of the CIA’s misdeeds in Africa

Saturday, 8 January 2022 — Africa is a Country

The CIA committed many crimes in the early days of post-independence Africa. But is it fair to call their interference “recolonization”?

Woman walks by the rather large vibrant mural dedicated to Patrice Lumumba, political leader who brought freedom to the Congo, in L.A.’s Leimert Park. Photo credit Joey Zanotti via Flickr CC BY 2.0.

In 1958, a year after it achieved independence from colonial rule, Ghana hosted a conference of African leaders, the first such gathering to ever take place on the continent. At the invitation of Ghana’s newly elected prime minister, Kwame Nkrumah, more than 300 leaders from 28 territories across Africa attended, including Patrice Lumumba of the still-Belgian Congo and Frantz Fanon, who was then living in still-French Algeria. It was a time of unlimited potential for a group of people determined to chart a new course for their homelands. But the host wanted his guests not to forget the dangers ahead of them. “Do not let us also forget that colonialism and imperialism may come to us yet in a different guise—not necessarily from Europe.”

Continue reading

Neocolonialism haunts Horn of Africa

5 January 2022 — Indian Punchline

Ethiopian troops vanquish US-backed Tigray rebels (File photo)

Chinese foreign ministers have traditionally marked the new year by visiting the African continent. Wang Yi’s 2022 African tour begins with Eritrea against the backdrop of the US strategy in the Horn of Africa to gain control of the strategically vital Red Sea that connects Indian Ocean with the Suez Canal.

Continue reading

Russia’s shadows in Sahel region

29 December 2021 — Indian Punchline

Tailors busy stitching Russian flags to meet rising demand in Bamako, the capital of Mali, December 26, 2021

On Friday, Mali’s transitional government has clarified that it is engaged with Russian military trainers even as French troops are drawing down. So, it is official that Russian security personnel are deployed to Mali.

Continue reading

Africa Has 17.46% of World’s Population, Only 3% of World’s COVID Deaths. Scientists Want to Know Why

7 December 2021 —  Mercola

As health experts look at global statistics, they have been stymied by the low rate of infection and death across the sub-Saharan African continent, compared to industrialized nations that used various lockdown procedures to contain the spread.

Scientists appear stymied by the low number of infections and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa where the vaccination rate is less than 6%.

Story at-a-glance:

  • Scientists appear stymied by the low number of infections and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa where the vaccination rate is less than 6%.
  • Africa has 17.46% of the world’s population and 3% of the COVID-19 global death toll while countries with better health care have higher death rates, including the Americas with 46% and Europe with 29%.
  • Nigeria, with the highest population, has had 3,000 deaths in 200 million people, which is what is recorded in the U.S. every two or three days. Yet, Nigeria has announced an all-out vaccination program to “prepare for the next wave.”
  • Factors that may have influenced the low infection and death rate are outdoor living that raises vitamin D levels, a younger population and access to medications and herbs used for other local conditions, but which are also known to reduce the severity of COVID.

Continue reading

Biden Demands Ethiopia’s Unconditional Surrender

20 October 2021 — Internationalist 360°

Ann Garrison

President Joe Biden continues to play the cluelessly racist and paternalistic Ugly American  in the Horn of Africa.

Under his leadership, the US has been at war with Ethiopia since last November, when its former puppet, the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, attacked a federal Ethiopian army base in Mekelle, the capital of the country’s Tigray Region. Tigrayans are only 6% of Ethiopia’s population, but the TPLF ruled the whole nation with an iron fist from 1991 to 2018, when popular uprisings forced them from power.

Continue reading

What Is France Hiding in the Sahel?

10 November 2021 — MintPress News

France’s Imperial Maneuvers

Copter

Reexamining and recalibrating its foreign policy towards Africa is something that may not appeal to France right now but it’s something that must be done.

By Clinton Nzala 

BAMAKO, MALI — On the 8th of October, Choguel Maïga, the prime minister of Mali, boldly informed the world that its former colonial power, France, was sponsoring terrorists in the country’s northern region. Standing before dozens of cameras and microphones, he provided details on how the French army had established an enclave in the northern town of Tidal and handed it over to well-known terrorist groups. The revelation was shocking not simply for the serious nature of the accusation but because in past times West African leaders have rarely sparred so openly with the French government. A chain of events simmering in the background for weeks triggered the latest spat.

Continue reading

Bill Gates and the Uncertain Future of Food Security

30 October 2021 — Off Guardian

Dustin Broadbery

As we approach a winter of discontent and Global food systems go from bad to worse, there’s trouble in paradise.

At the root of these problems, Government responses to COVID-19 have contributed to a six-fold increase in famine-like conditions as global supply chains collapse, and field trials for gene-edited crops and farm animals begin in the UK.

Continue reading

Gaslighting 1.1 Billion Africans

15 October 2021 — Consortium News

It is generally easier for countries that offer development finance for energy projects to make low-carbon rules for others, not for themselves, write Benjamin Attia and Morgan Bazilian.
The majority of the Congolese population doesn’t have access to electricity. (Eduardo Soteras, AFP via Getty Images)

By Benjamin Attia and Morgan Bazilian 

The Conversation 

Today’s global energy inequities are staggering.

Video gamers in California consume more electricity than entire nations. The average Tanzanian used only one-sixth the electricity consumed by a typical American refrigerator in 2014.

Continue reading

‘The Demonization Was Meant to Pacify Readers to Accept the Brutality’

22 September 2021 — FAIR

Janine Jackson interviewed Milton Allimadi about New York Times coverage of Africa for the September 17, 2021, episode of CounterSpin. This is a lightly edited transcript.

NYT: Colonialism's Back--and Not a Moment Too Soon

New York Times Magazine (4/18/93)

Janine Jackson: Benighted. Backward. Tribal. Corrupt. Inherently violent, yet somehow also docile unto imbecility.

Listeners will be familiar with the imagery that corporate media have long used to talk about Africa and Africans. Not just tabloids that blare their racism in crude cartoons–elite media have been key in promoting the narrative in which Europeans represent civilization, which they feel moved to provide, on their own terms naturally, to Africans that could never otherwise attain it.

Continue reading

Imperialism and its discontents

20 August 2021 — New Frame

The United States has wreaked destruction across the planet and bringing an end to its reign of terror is urgent. But an organisation such as the Taliban offers only new forms of oppression.

Circa 1915: American naval officers and marines from the USS Washington come ashore for the capture of Port-au-Prince in Haiti. (Photograph by Getty Images)Circa 1915: American naval officers and marines from the USS Washington come ashore for the capture of Port-au-Prince in Haiti. (Photograph by Getty Images)

On the night of 14 August 1791, enslaved Africans gathered in the Bois Caïman forest and planned the revolt that would begin the Haitian Revolution. Last week, on the 230th anniversary of this meeting, Haiti was hit by an earthquake that has upturned the lives of more than a million people. The count of the lives lost stood at 1 941 at the time of writing, with around 10 000 more injured. The following day, the Taliban took the city of Kabul and thereby control of Afghanistan.

Continue reading

Marxism in Africa (1975)

6 August 2021 — RedSails.org

Walter Rodney

Walter Rodney was born in Guyana in 1942, acquired his doctorate in England at the age of 24, and then traveled widely in the Caribbean and Africa.

In 1972 he published his legendary work How Europe Underdeveloped Africa.

He was assassinated via a car-bomb in Georgetown in 1980, and the crime is widely believed to have been orchestrated by Forbes Burnham, the president of Guyana at the time.

Rodney gave this speech at Queen’s College in New York, USA in 1975. [1]


Continue reading

A Senseless Cathedral of Doom: The Twenty-Eighth Newsletter (2021)

15 July 2021 — Tricontinental

01 Cover 1

Dear friends,

Greetings from the desk of the Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research.

In early June 2021, the United States military led a major military exercise on the African continent: the African Lion 21.  Major General Andrew Rohling of the US Army’s Southern European Task Force said it was the ‘largest US military exercise ever conducted on this continent’. The African Lion military exercise, which was first held with the Kingdom of Morocco in 2002, is – in the words of US Africa Command – an annual ‘joint, all-domain, multi-national exercise … to counter malign activity in North Africa and Southern Europe, and increase interoperability between US, African, and international partners to defend the theatre from adversary military aggression’. African Lion 21, which included the armed forces of 21 countries including Brazil, Canada, Egypt, Italy, Libya, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom, took place in Morocco and in the occupied territory of Western Sahara as well as in Senegal and Tunisia. The overall military exercise – with over 7,000 soldiers – was conducted under the leadership of the US Africa Command with the assistance of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO).

Continue reading

Defending Our Sovereignty: US Military Bases in Africa and the Future of African Unity

5 July 2021 — Tricontinental

Dossier no. 42  Co-publication with The Socialist Movement of Ghana’s Research Group

01072021 Dossier 42 images 1Some of AFRICOM’s known permanent and semi-permanent military bases on the African continent, 2019.

How do you visualise the footprint of Empire?

The images in this dossier map some of AFRICOM’s military bases on the African continent – both ‘enduring’ and ‘non-enduring’, as they are officially called. The satellite photos were gathered by data artist Josh Begley, who led a mapping project to answer the question: ‘how do you measure a military footprint?’

Continue reading

The Gates Foundation’s “Corporate Merry-go-round”: Spearheading the Neo-liberal Plunder of African Agriculture

2 July 2021 — Global Research

By Colin Todhunter

This important article by Colin Todhunter published more than five years ago (on January 21, 2016)  analyses how the Gates Foundation had contributed to exacerbating social inequalities and “uprooting indigenous agriculture for the benefit of global agribusiness”.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is dangerously and unaccountably distorting the direction of international development, according to a new report by the campaign group Global Justice Now. With assets of $43.5 billion, the BMGF is the largest charitable foundation in the world. It actually distributes more aid for global health than any government. As a result, it has a major influence on issues of global health and agriculture.

Continue reading

Burkina Faso: How to Destroy a Nation in 10 Years

2 July 2021 — Consortium News

Danny Sjursen offers a U.S. case study in Burkina Faso on how to destroy a country in a decade.

April 10, 2018: Burkinabe soldier arriving at Niamey, Niger, during Operation Flintlock, an annual, integrated military and police exercise inaugurated in 2005. (U.S. Air Force, Clayton Cupit)

By Danny Sjursen
AntiWar.com

If the U.S. government was trying to destroy Burkina Faso, it could hardly have done it any better. This  already impoverished, landlocked West African country is simply symptomatic of Franco-America’s Sahel-wide exercise in absurdity.

Continue reading

Horn of Africa — Washington’s Next Arab Spring?

1 July 2021 — — Origin: New Eastern Outlook

F. William Engdahl

ETH8532

The Biden State Department has just named career diplomat Jeffrey Feltman to be Special Envoy to the Horn of Africa. Given the geopolitical powder keg in the region and given the dark history of Feltman, especially in Lebanon and during the infamous CIA Arab Spring interventions after 2009, the relevant question is whether Washington has decided to explode the entire region from Ethiopia down to Egypt into a repeat of the Syria chaos only far more dangerous. And it’s not only the US which is active in the region.

Continue reading

West Africa is the Latest Testing Ground for US Military Artificial Intelligence

29 April 2021 — Mint Press

      Machine wars

In its preparation for great power competition, the US military is modernizing its artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques and testing them in West Africa.

By  Scott Timcke

NIAMI, NIGER (Africa is a Country) — One striking feature of US military involvement in West Africa is the absence of an observable strategic vision for a desired end state. Nominally, US presence in the region’s multilayered conflicts revolves around building “security cooperation” with state partners to improve counterterrorism capabilities, ostensibly providing protection to communities that states cannot. Concurrently, the US military is typically the prime diplomatic entity for high-level bilateral engagements. The result is that the US military is propping up the public authority of weak states, albeit in an ad hoc fashion that lurches from crisis to crisis.

Continue reading

Gates Unhinged: Dystopian Vision for the Future of Food

18 April 2021 — Off Guardian

Colin Todhunter

Bill gates farmland 2000x900

We are currently seeing an acceleration of the corporate consolidation of the entire global agrifood chain. The high-tech/data conglomerates, including Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook and Google, have joined traditional agribusiness giants, such as Corteva, Bayer, Cargill and Syngenta, in a quest to impose a certain type of agriculture and food production on the world.

Continue reading

Black Alliance for Peace: Fascism Was Born in the Colonies, Not Europe

8 April 2021 — Internationalist 360°

Ajamu Baraka, the former Green Party vice presidential candidate and current national organizer for the Black Alliance for Peace – a member of the Black is Back Coalition — says Europe must be “de-centered” from discussions of fascism. African people need to “reject the assumption that fascism was something new and unique to Europe in the early 20th century,” said Baraka. In fact, “the fascism that emerged in Europe did not break from the totalitarian logic and practice of European colonialism. Practices that were applied in the colonies” were now “applied in Europe.”

Continue reading