Thomas Sankara: Imperialism is the Arsonist of Our Forests and Savannas

1 October 2019 — Internationalist 360°

This speech was first given at the first International Silva Conference for the Protection of the Trees and Forests in Paris. It has been since been disseminated by revolutionaries through many means as a way to underscore the necessity of social revolution and an environmental focus. Now more than ever this speech is necessary to internalize, as we face profound and previously unseen danger regarding environmental crises in capitalism. Comrade Thomas Sankara died in service of this task, and the very least we can do is pay tribute to what it is he died for, and internalize the lessons of the Burkinabè revolution. As always, the following has been made available here for the purposes of study and struggle.

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How to Find a Tiger in Africa: Searching for Agostinho Neto (1922 –1979) By T.P. Wilkinson

18 September 2019 — Black Agenda Report

How to Find a Tiger in Africa: Searching for Agostinho Neto (1922 –1979)
The history of liberated Angola, like the history of the world, cannot be told by humanity’s oppressors.

“In the jargon of the ‘West,’ anyone called a communist who becomes a head of state must be a dictator.”

What I want to do here is something very simple. I want to explain how I began to search for Agostinho Neto. I also want to explain the perspective that shapes this search.[i]

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Ruth Nyambura: “The Venezuelan revolution is the African revolution”

10 June 2019 — Peoples Dispatch

Kenyan activist Ruth Nyambura of the African Ecofeminist Collective spoke to Peoples Dispatch in Caracas, Venezuela during the International Peoples’ Assembly in February.

Ruth spoke about the intersections of climate change, imperialism and patriarchy in Kenya. She also affirmed her deep commitment to Venezuela and the Bolivarian revolution.

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Dossier 16: Resource sovereignty—the Agenda for Africa’s exit from the state of plunder

10 May 2019 —  Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research – MROnline

In May 2011, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) published a Working Paper by Burcu Aydin called ‘Ghana: Will It Be Gifted Or Will It Be Cursed?’ (WP/11/104). Oil had just been discovered off the shore of Ghana. This anticipated a bounty of revenue for the country. Aydin asks whether Ghana will face the ‘resource curse’. The resource curse – also known as the Dutch Disease – occurs where revenue from sale of this resource rushes into a country, appreciates the currency and causes a major crisis in other parts of the economy. Looking at 150 middle- and low-income countries, Aydin came up with a strong finding: ‘Results show that there is a poverty trap for poor resource-rich countries due to their low institutional quality’. Bad governance and poor macroeconomic management, Aydin suggests, diminish the possibility for the onrush of revenues from natural resources to enhance a country’s development. There is no mention, in the IMF’s Working Paper, of the other actors in the process – namely, the multinational companies that dominate the natural resource extraction business. The pro-corporate literature explains problems in the resource economy in two ways: 1) poor macroeconomic management that allows revenues to flood the economy and appreciate the currency, 2) bad governance because of corruption and theft by government officials.

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From the BRICS countries to the townships: racial and social segregation continues

25 April 2019 — MROnline

From the BRICS countries to the townships: racial and social segregation continues

Originally published: CADTM (Committee for the Abolition of Illitigimate Debt) (April 22, 2019)

First part of a 2 part series

Over 25 years ago now the people of South Africa won the struggle to end the Apartheid regime.(1) Nevertheless, even though it is now against the law, de facto racial segregation is still apparent. Moreover the capitalist assault on the majority of the population is blatant. The class struggle is all the more clearly perceptible as the main social progress has been the rise to capitalist status of a small minority of Blacks. While there are white and black capitalists, the majority of the non white population are still living in serious to extreme hardship.

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Africa as Colonial as Ever: US “New Africa Strategy” Old Oil in New Bottles

17 April 2019 — Mint Press

Months after U.S. National Security Advisor John Bolton announced the “New Africa Strategy” at the Heritage Foundation, the US’ new policy has killed civilians, exploited Africa’s resources and used the continent as a battleground for provoking tensions with Russia and China.

by Cale Holmes and Erica Jung

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The Overthrow of Omar el-Bechir by Thierry Meyssan

16 April 2019 — Voltaire Network

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During an official ceremony, President Omar el-Bechir (right) in the company of General Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf (left), who overthrew him.

Certain pockets of Sudan are still at war, and the Khartoum government is still military. Nothing has changed despite the fact that President Omar el-Bechir has been toppled. For Thierry Meyssan, Sudan’s problem, after 30 years of dictatorship by the Muslim Brotherhood, is above all cultural. Current events have no relation with an aspiration for liberty, but only with freedom from starvation.

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Battlefield Libya: Fruits of US-NATO Regime Change By Tony Cartalucci

10 April 2019 — New Eastern Outlook

 Libya is back in the news, as fighting escalates around the capital, Tripoli

Forces under the control of Khalifa Haftar – a former Libyan general under the government of Muammar Qaddafi – turned opposition during the 2011 US-led NATO intervention – turned “opposition” again against the UN-backed “Government of National Accord” (GNA) seated in Tripoli – have most recently reached Tripoli’s airport.

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