Jorge Majfud, "Eduardo Galeano: The Open Eyes of Latin America"

Very few writers maintain total indifference toward the ethics of their work.  Those who have thought that in the practice of literature it is possible to separate ethics from aesthetics, however, are not so few.  Jorge Luis Borges, not without mastery, practiced a kind of politics of aesthetic neutrality, perhaps convinced of its possibility.  Thus, the universalism of Borges’ precocious postmodernism was nothing more than the very eurocentrism of the Modern Age nuanced with the exoticism proper to an empire that, much like the British empire, held closely to the old decadent nostalgia for the mysteries of a colonized India and for Arabian nights removed from the dangers of history.  It was not recognition of diversity — of equal freedom — but confirmation of the superiority of the European canon adorned with the souvenirs and booty of war.

Continue reading

Jorge Majfud, “Eduardo Galeano: The Open Eyes of Latin America”

Very few writers maintain total indifference toward the ethics of their work.  Those who have thought that in the practice of literature it is possible to separate ethics from aesthetics, however, are not so few.  Jorge Luis Borges, not without mastery, practiced a kind of politics of aesthetic neutrality, perhaps convinced of its possibility.  Thus, the universalism of Borges’ precocious postmodernism was nothing more than the very eurocentrism of the Modern Age nuanced with the exoticism proper to an empire that, much like the British empire, held closely to the old decadent nostalgia for the mysteries of a colonized India and for Arabian nights removed from the dangers of history.  It was not recognition of diversity — of equal freedom — but confirmation of the superiority of the European canon adorned with the souvenirs and booty of war.

Continue reading