Haiti: The Epic of a Great Popular Uprising By Carlos Aznarez

17 June 2019 — Internationalist 360°

For almost two weeks now, the people of Haiti have been the protagonists of a large-scale insurrection. Two weeks, if not two months, two years or two centuries. But despite this, the world continues to ignore the bravery of these women and men who, as Haitian wrestler Henry Boisrolin rightly says, “have nothing left to lose because even their lives have been taken away”.

The silence about what is happening in Haiti is overwhelming, and it is a pity that the conscience and soul of the people who led the first great anti-slavery revolution and the cry for Independence in 1804 have been punished in this way. Not only because of the consecutive invasions of the United States that turned the country into a colony once again enslaved and of limitless poverty, but also because those who throughout the years proclaimed their desire to “help” to alleviate the population’ needs, as is the case with the UN troops, enlisted in the MINUSTAH, and now in the MINIJUSTH, they also became jailers, serial rapists of children, poisoners of rivers, provocateurs of cholera epidemics, voracious rapists who left nothing to steal or destroy.

There’ s not much to say about the majority of the presidents who were the subjects of the same interests driven by the invaders: Dartiguenave and Borno, mere viceroys of Washington during the Yankee occupation, Duvalier, the murderer “president for life”, master and lord of the ferocious Tontons-Macoutes or “National Security Volunteers” who murdered 30,000 people; Aristide who tried to break the chains and ended up chained himself to the pretensions of the United States, and the last on the list: Martelly, buffoon, corrupt and repressive and the current, Jovenel Moise, a boss, screwed to an armchair that no longer belongs to him, and guilty of acts of corruption related to stuffing in his pocket and that of his henchmen part of the money (more than 4.2 billion dollars) so generously derived from the Bolivarian Revolution in Venezuela through Petrocaribe.

Currently the Haitian economy is bankrupt, the minimum wage of the very few who still have work is 5 dollars a day and the unemployment rate is around 70 percent, the lack of housing due to the earthquake and the blatant theft of aid that resulted, means that much of the population still sleep in makeshift tents or right below the sky.

But the caste in the government is reluctant to leave and avoid more pain than it has caused. Moise and a cabinet hitchhiked rather than by popular vote, since the last elections were scandalously fraudulent, are surrounded by the insurrection of what Frantz Fanon called the “damned of the land,” but they do not yield precisely because no one in the world seems interested in Haiti.

Just as Washington aligns its Latin American puppet governments and the OAS colonies ministry to harass and try to suffocate heroic revolutionary Venezuela, as there are hundreds of newspapers, radio stations and television networks at all hours to vilify its legitimate president Nicolas Maduro, that foul disinformation racket is nothing when it comes to talking about the tragedy of the Haitian people.

For all of this, it is necessary that those of us in public communication try to bring the reality of those who fight for their freedom closer, not to be silent, not to conceal, not to distort the brave deeds that Haiti is carrying out today. There, where in the last two weeks hundreds of thousands took to the streets in protest, marching and marking with fire (literally speaking) the provocative institutions of power, the luxurious hotels of the corrupt.

All the corners of the big cities smell of burned tires of the barricades, only it is enough to see the artisan videos of the same protagonists of the popular uprising film daily. Humble people helping each other to help the wounded and bury as many as possible those who have died as a result of government repression, but who, in spite of everything, do not abandon the territory already conquered.

Young people hooded not to suffocate by gas fighting with stones against bullets, but also realizing that very soon this peaceful disobedience will have to take a qualitative leap if they really want to end the dictatorship of those who oppress them.

All these actions, accompanied by several days of general strike, which this Monday will again paralyze all the schools in the country and will be accompanied by a similar measure in each of the state establishments.

“OUT MOISE” is the battle cry in which all the left parties and popular organizations agree, “OUT MOISE the corrupt one” protected by Trump and Europe, but also this same demand also means an enormous “enough” of parapolice gangs that are generating massacres in different points of the country and have already forced more than two thousand peasants to move in the area of Arbonite.

This is reality in Haiti or as the popular leader Camille Chalmers says very well: “The situation is absolutely ungovernable” and the only one who does not want to know is Jovenel Moise himself.

This is really the way things are in Haiti or as the popular leader Camille Chalmers says: “The situation is absolutely ungovernable” and the only one who does not want to know this is Jovenel Moise himself.

Haiti, that small and admired heart of Africa in the Caribbean, where a great majority, precisely those who have erupted with force to recapture the revolutionary legacy of liberator Jean Jacques Dessalines, are unwilling to tolerate short cuts that end in new frustrations. Take note: they are an upright people and they want to govern.Translation by Internationalist 360° 

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