Britain: The Database State

23 May 2019 — True Publica

By TruePublica: Britain is a surveillance state, the worst in the democratic West. In a short period of time, it has amassed a rather sordid history of citizen surveillance – and it continues to be unlawful. Last September’s damning judgement of British security operations against its own people saw the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) rule that the government had unlawfully obtained data from communications companies and didn’t put in place safeguards around how it did it.  But what does the state really know about us and what about the future?

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Government forced to delete millions of illegal citizen biometric voiceprints

14 May 2019 — True Publica

Last year, TruePublica published an article about how the British government were now going ‘full Orwellian‘ in their attempt to build a national biometric database. The opening line to the article was – “We said that the government would eventually take the biometric data of every single citizen living in Britain and use it for nefarious reasons.  DNA, fingerprint, face, and even voice data will be included. But that’s not all.” 

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Statewatch News Online, 13 May 2019 (12/19)

13 May 2019 — Statewatch

e-mail: office@statewatch.org

Also available as a pdf file: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/may/email-may-13-19.pdf

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STATEWATCH NEWS

1.    Mytilene, Greece: Peaceful demonstration and the human right to freedom of assembly prevails
2.    EU: Frontex gets ready to deploy to the Balkans
3.    EU: Construction of the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS)
4.    EU criminal law could cover “crimes relating to artificial intelligence”
5.    EU: The human rights monitoring ship Mare Liberum is being prevented from leaving port
6.    Refugee crisis: latest news from across Europe 
7.    EU: Common European Asylum System: deadlock in the Council
8.    ECHR: Terrorism convict can be deported from France to Algeria without any ri

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Statewatch News Online, 29 April 2019 (10/19)

29 April 2019 — Statewatch

Also available as a pdf file: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/apr/email-29-april.pdf

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STATEWATCH NEWS

1.  EU: Police press ahead with efforts to automate cross-border information-sharing
2.  EU: National security and fundamental rights: problems with definitions and the rule of law
3.  SPAIN: Ethnic profiling in Catalonia: for every police identity check on a Spanish national
4.  Refugee crisis: latest news from across Europe (9-15.4.19)

NEWS

1.   EU lawmakers rubber-stamp European Defence Fund, give up parliamentary veto
2.   UK: Self-harm in detention centre up threefold in three years despite drop in population
3.   German Police launches “National Internet Referral Unit“
4.   MALTA: Media reports on foreign suspects show worrying trends, researchers say
5.   Case filed against Greece in Strasbourg Court over Crackdown on Humanitarian Organisations
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Statewatch News Online, 18 March 2019 (07/19)

18 March 2019 — Statewatch.org

Also available as a pdf file: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2019/mar/email-18-mar.pdf

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STATEWATCH NEWS

1.   EU: Open letter to MEPs: oppose mandatory fingerprinting for national identity cards
2.   EU: Security Union: new measures  introduce biometric identity cards and a new database
3.   ECHR: Three judgments: detention of and lack of care for unaccompanied minors in Greece
4.   EU: Biometrics, extended travel surveillance, internal-external “synergies”:
5.   EU: Saving lives in the Mediterranean: human rights organisations propose plan
6.   Refugee crisis: latest news from across Europe (5-12.3.19)
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UK mass surveillance challenge will go to Europe’s highest human rights court

13 February 2019 — True Publica

UK mass surveillance challenge will go to Europe’s highest human rights court

The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights will hear Big Brother Watch & others’ case against mass surveillance by the UK government.

In September 2018 the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) ruled that the UK’s mass interception programmes breached the European Convention on Human Rights. The landmark judgment in September marked the Court’s first ruling on UK mass surveillance programmes revealed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

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Statewatch News Online, 12 December 2018 (18/18)

13 December 2018 — Statewatch

e-mail: office@statewatch.org

Also available as a pdf file: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2018/dec/email-dec.pdf

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ANALYSIS

1. Statewatch Analysis: ‘More police’ is not a synonym for ‘more security’ by Andreu Merino. 

STATEWATCH NEWS

1.    Talk by Aidan White at the launch of Statewatch’s Library & Archive
2.    IRELAND: High Court strikes down Ireland’s data retention regime
3.    Refugee crisis: latest news from across Europe (3-10.12.18)
4.    Travel surveillance: USA calls for global PNR standard and seeks to export profiling software
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A World First In Citizen Surveillance By The State

6 December 2018 — True Publica

By TruePublica: Last month TruePublica reported that the British government were going full Orwellian and was now aiming to create a biometric database on top of its mass data bulk collection through surveillance systems that have been deemed illegal by the highest courts in the UK and EU. However, in Australia – a member of the Five-Eyes surveillance clan, the law is being changed to take us one step closer to the complete eradication of privacy.

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Is China Really More “Dystopian” Than The UK? By Andrew KORYBKO

4 December 2018 — Oriental Review

RT reported that the UK’s so-called “National Data Analytics Solution” will see an algorithm process whichever of 30 separate data points have been recorded about a person in local and national police databases in order to predict which members of the population are most likely to commit a crime or be victimized by one, after which the state will dispatch local health and social workers to offer “counseling” to them in an attempt to prevent the computer’s envisioned scenario from transpiring. This program is being likened to the 2002 film “Minority Report” and carries with it a vibe of China’s controversial “social credit” system, albeit without any “rewards” being offered for law-abiding behavior. In fact, one can actually make the claim that instead of the UK copying China to a degree, it was actually China that learned from the UK seeing as how the island nation’s mass surveillance system used to be far ahead of the communist nation’s one.

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