Egypt’s ‘color coup’ By Eric Walberg

22 August 2013 — Eric Walberg

Asmaa was shot in the back with US bullets

A new tactic has been added to the US democracy promotion arsenal, where ‘color revolutions’ are too difficult, and ‘postmodern coups’ fail. 

The smoke is already clearing in the wake of Egypt’s latest coup—the whodunnit and why. All traces of the post-2011 attempts to reform and clean up the corruption of the previous 40 years are systematically being erased. All appointees under Morsi are being replaced by military officials and old-guard Mubarakites. A state of emergency and trials by military courts are in place. Complete disregard for legal norms—presided over by the Mubarakite head of the Supreme Constitutional Court and interim President Adly Mansour—is the order of the day.

Continue reading

Egypt in the Calculations of Regional and Global Political Powers By Nikolai MALISHEVSKI

20 August 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The vivid pictures filling the world media of what has been happening recently in Egypt are very reminiscent of the most critical moments of the «revolution» of 2011. At that time the local and world television channels were also filled with reports in a style very similar to today’s events: a furious, seething mob, bewildered policemen, Western correspondents broadcasting with tense, focused expressions on their faces…

Continue reading

Egypt’s Coup Churns up Regional Politics (II) By Melkulangara BHADRAKUMAR

4 July 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

Part I

In the event, s series of concessions offered by Mohamed Morsi during his four-hour meeting in the presidential palace with General Abdul Fatah al-Sissi, head of the Egyptian army, didn’t prove sufficient enough. The political concessions offered by Morsi were, according to the Guardian newspaper, the following: Continue reading

Egypt: Muslim Brotherhood Will Not Capitulate (I) By Melkulangara BHADRAKUMAR

3 July 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

Egypt is on the brink, and, paradoxically, it is probably going to continue to remain that way in the near term. 

The narrative we hear is far too simplistic. It goes something like this: an elected government turned out to be not only inept but arrogant and crudely insensitive toward the imperative need of inclusive democracy; a stagnant economy; rising prices; fuel shortages; power cuts – discontent is boiling over. 

Continue reading

Why millions of Egyptians wanted Morsi out By Abayomi Azikiwe

3 July 2013 — Pambazuka News Issue 637 

The only real hope for Egypt is the formation of a government of national unity where the progressive forces are at the centre of the emerging political dispensation

STOP PRESS: Following mass protests, Egypt’s army has ousted President Mohammed Morsi from power, placed him under house arrest, suspended the constitution and pledged to hold early elections. The top judge of Egypt’s Constitutional Court, Adly Mahmud Mansour, has been sworn in as interim leader.

Continue reading