The Overthrow of Omar el-Bechir by Thierry Meyssan

16 April 2019 — Voltaire Network

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During an official ceremony, President Omar el-Bechir (right) in the company of General Ahmed Awad Ibn Auf (left), who overthrew him.

Certain pockets of Sudan are still at war, and the Khartoum government is still military. Nothing has changed despite the fact that President Omar el-Bechir has been toppled. For Thierry Meyssan, Sudan’s problem, after 30 years of dictatorship by the Muslim Brotherhood, is above all cultural. Current events have no relation with an aspiration for liberty, but only with freedom from starvation.

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Obama, ISIS and the Muslim Brotherhood. The PSD-11 “Secret Blueprint” to Implement Regime Change across Middle East By F. William Engdahl

26 December 2018 — Global Research

There is a great uproar over the recent decision by US President Trump to pull US troops out of Syria, announcing his reason for doing so is that ISIS, the so-called Islamic State, has largely been defeated. What lies behind the decision and more important, what was behind the surprise emergence of ISIS across Syria in 2014 brings the spotlight to yet-classified documents of the Obama term. If the reorganized Justice Department is compelled to make these documents public in lawsuits or Freedom of Information requests, it could rock organizations such as the CIA and many in the Obama camp.

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Saudi Regime Survives but Enters the Time of Troubles By Melkulangara BHADRAKUMAR

6 November 2018 — Strategic Culture Foundation

In a sensational disclosure quoting “intelligence sources”, former Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer wrote in the Financial Review newspaper on Sunday that the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi who was murdered on October 2 in Turkey was far from a “bleeding heart liberal” but was a seasoned intelligence agent and a sympathizer of the Muslim Brotherhood working on regime change in his country.

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Egypt on the verge of a social explosion By Jean Shaoul

26 March 2014 — WSWS

The purpose of the military junta’s savage repression of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), expressed most recently in the mass death sentence handed down March 24 against 529 of its members, is not just the elimination of its main bourgeois political rival. It is aimed at intimidating and suppressing opposition to what the military-backed government has in store for the working class.

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Egyptian revolutionary socialist: ‘We are facing a counterrevolution’

23 December 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal

Rana Nessim and Rosemary Bechler interviewed Sameh Naguib (pictured below), a leading member of the Revolutionary Socialists in Egypt, on October 24, 2013. The interview was published on the openDemocracy website on November 8. Nessim is associate editor for openDemocracy’s Arab Awakening page. Bechler is editor of openDemocracyLinks International Journal of Socialist Renewal has added subheads and abridged the interview for reasons of space. The full text is available at HERE. Continue reading

A Short History Of The War On Syria – 2006-2014

14 September 2013 — Moon of Alabama

In 2006 the U.S. was at war in Iraq. Some of the enemy forces it very much struggled to fight against were coming in through Syria. The same year Israel lost a war against Hizbullah. Its armored forces were ambushed whenever they tried to push deeper into Lebanon while Hizbullah managed to continuously fire rockets against Israeli army position and cities. Hizbullah receives supply for its missile force from Syria and from Iran through Syria. Continue reading

Deaths on the Nile: Is Egypt’s revolution following the course of Iran’s? BY SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK

24 August 2013 — In These Times

Now that the Egyptian Army has decided to break the stalemate and cleanse the public space of Islamist protesters, and the result is hundreds of deaths, one should first just imagine what an uproar this would have caused if the same bloodbath were to happen, say, in Iran. However, it is more urgent to take a step back and focus on the absent third party in the ongoing conflict: Where are the protesters who took over Tahrir Square two-and-a-half years ago? Is their role now not weirdly similar to the role of the Muslim Brotherhood during the 2011 Arab Spring—that of the impassive observer?

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Egypt’s ‘color coup’ By Eric Walberg

22 August 2013 — Eric Walberg

Asmaa was shot in the back with US bullets

A new tactic has been added to the US democracy promotion arsenal, where ‘color revolutions’ are too difficult, and ‘postmodern coups’ fail. 

The smoke is already clearing in the wake of Egypt’s latest coup—the whodunnit and why. All traces of the post-2011 attempts to reform and clean up the corruption of the previous 40 years are systematically being erased. All appointees under Morsi are being replaced by military officials and old-guard Mubarakites. A state of emergency and trials by military courts are in place. Complete disregard for legal norms—presided over by the Mubarakite head of the Supreme Constitutional Court and interim President Adly Mansour—is the order of the day.

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Egypt's Sisi banishes wild dogs By M K Bhadrakumar

20 August 2013 — Asia Times

Yves Jego, mayor of Montereau-Fault-Yonne, in the southeast suburb of Paris, announced on Monday that dog owners in his town with no sense of civic duty will be henceforth caught on closed-television cameras if they do not pick up their pet’s waste, and offenders will be fined 35 euros (US$46). 

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Egypt in the Calculations of Regional and Global Political Powers By Nikolai MALISHEVSKI

20 August 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The vivid pictures filling the world media of what has been happening recently in Egypt are very reminiscent of the most critical moments of the «revolution» of 2011. At that time the local and world television channels were also filled with reports in a style very similar to today’s events: a furious, seething mob, bewildered policemen, Western correspondents broadcasting with tense, focused expressions on their faces…

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Pharaoh al-Sisi sits tight By M K Bhadrakumar

16 August 2013 — Asia Times

The highly opportunistic stance taken by the “big powers” who are veto-holding permanent members of the United Nations Security Council has prevented that august body from articulating an outright condemnation of the brutality with which the Egyptian military massacred more than 1,000 civilians in Cairo on Wednesday. 

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