Egypt bans yellow vest sales as French protesters reject Macron’s concessions By Alex Lantier

11 December 2018 — WSWS

The bloody Egyptian dictatorship of General Abdel Fattah al Sisi is banning the sale of yellow vests, as protests spread internationally in sympathy with the movement against French President Emmanuel Macron. This came as “yellow vest” protesters in France rejected Macron’s offer of concessions in an attempt to placate the growing movement.

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President al-Sisi chooses Psychopath and War Criminal Tony Blair as economic advisor

4 July 2014 — Voltaire Net

blair-psycho
 
According to the Guardian, Tony Blair – former British prime minister and current Representative of the Quartet on the Middle East (EU, Russia, UN, USA) – has been appointed Egyptian President al-Sisi’s new economic advisor [1]

His salary will be paid by the United Arab Emirates, not Egypt.

[1] “Blair embodies corruption and war. He must be sacked”, Seumas Milne, The Guardian, 2 July 2014

Video: Exclusive: Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah on Prison & Regime’s "War on a Whole Generation"

31 March 2014 — Democracy Now!

In a Democracy Now! global broadcast exclusive, we spend the hour with one of Egypt’s most prominent dissidents, Alaa Abd El-Fattah, speaking in his first extended interview after nearly four months behind bars. An open Internet and political activist, Fattah has been at the forefront of the struggle for change in Egypt for many years and has the distinction of having been actively persecuted by Egypt’s past four successive rulers. Facing a potential return to prison in the coming months, Fattah sits down with Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous to discuss his case, Egypt’s future and its ongoing crackdown on activists. “They are on a sentencing frenzy,” Fattah says of Egypt’s military rulers. “This is not just about me. It’s almost as if it’s a war on a whole generation.” Special thanks to Omar Robert Hamilton and Sherine Tadros (inc. transcript).

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Video: Exclusive: Egyptian Activist Alaa Abd El-Fattah on Prison & Regime’s “War on a Whole Generation”

31 March 2014 — Democracy Now!

In a Democracy Now! global broadcast exclusive, we spend the hour with one of Egypt’s most prominent dissidents, Alaa Abd El-Fattah, speaking in his first extended interview after nearly four months behind bars. An open Internet and political activist, Fattah has been at the forefront of the struggle for change in Egypt for many years and has the distinction of having been actively persecuted by Egypt’s past four successive rulers. Facing a potential return to prison in the coming months, Fattah sits down with Democracy Now! correspondent Sharif Abdel Kouddous to discuss his case, Egypt’s future and its ongoing crackdown on activists. “They are on a sentencing frenzy,” Fattah says of Egypt’s military rulers. “This is not just about me. It’s almost as if it’s a war on a whole generation.” Special thanks to Omar Robert Hamilton and Sherine Tadros (inc. transcript).

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Egypt on the verge of a social explosion By Jean Shaoul

26 March 2014 — WSWS

The purpose of the military junta’s savage repression of the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), expressed most recently in the mass death sentence handed down March 24 against 529 of its members, is not just the elimination of its main bourgeois political rival. It is aimed at intimidating and suppressing opposition to what the military-backed government has in store for the working class.

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Egyptian revolutionary socialist: ‘We are facing a counterrevolution’

23 December 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal

Rana Nessim and Rosemary Bechler interviewed Sameh Naguib (pictured below), a leading member of the Revolutionary Socialists in Egypt, on October 24, 2013. The interview was published on the openDemocracy website on November 8. Nessim is associate editor for openDemocracy’s Arab Awakening page. Bechler is editor of openDemocracyLinks International Journal of Socialist Renewal has added subheads and abridged the interview for reasons of space. The full text is available at HERE. Continue reading

Syria, Egypt Reveal Erdogan’s Hidden “Neo-Ottoman Agenda” By Nicola Nasser

20 November 2013 — Global Research

The eruption of the Syrian conflict early in 2011 heralded the demise of Turkey ’s officially pronounced strategy of “Zero Problems with Neighbors,” but more importantly, it revealed a “hidden agenda” in Turkish foreign policy under the government of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

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Deaths on the Nile: Is Egypt’s revolution following the course of Iran’s? BY SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK

24 August 2013 — In These Times

Now that the Egyptian Army has decided to break the stalemate and cleanse the public space of Islamist protesters, and the result is hundreds of deaths, one should first just imagine what an uproar this would have caused if the same bloodbath were to happen, say, in Iran. However, it is more urgent to take a step back and focus on the absent third party in the ongoing conflict: Where are the protesters who took over Tahrir Square two-and-a-half years ago? Is their role now not weirdly similar to the role of the Muslim Brotherhood during the 2011 Arab Spring—that of the impassive observer?

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On Egypt’s Class-Struggle: Rabias Of The World Unite By Ramzy Baroud

21 August 2013 — Ramzy Baroud

“Lord! You know well that my keen desire is to carry out Your commandments and to serve Thee with all my heart, O light of my eyes. If I were free I would pass the whole day and night in prayers. But what should I do when you have made me a slave of a human being?”

These were the words of the female Muslim mystic and poet, Rabia Al-Adawiya. Her journey from slavery to freedom served as a generational testament of the resolve of the individual who was armed with faith and nothing else.

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Egypt’s ‘color coup’ By Eric Walberg

22 August 2013 — Eric Walberg

Asmaa was shot in the back with US bullets

A new tactic has been added to the US democracy promotion arsenal, where ‘color revolutions’ are too difficult, and ‘postmodern coups’ fail. 

The smoke is already clearing in the wake of Egypt’s latest coup—the whodunnit and why. All traces of the post-2011 attempts to reform and clean up the corruption of the previous 40 years are systematically being erased. All appointees under Morsi are being replaced by military officials and old-guard Mubarakites. A state of emergency and trials by military courts are in place. Complete disregard for legal norms—presided over by the Mubarakite head of the Supreme Constitutional Court and interim President Adly Mansour—is the order of the day.

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Egypt in the Calculations of Regional and Global Political Powers By Nikolai MALISHEVSKI

20 August 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The vivid pictures filling the world media of what has been happening recently in Egypt are very reminiscent of the most critical moments of the «revolution» of 2011. At that time the local and world television channels were also filled with reports in a style very similar to today’s events: a furious, seething mob, bewildered policemen, Western correspondents broadcasting with tense, focused expressions on their faces…

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Pharaoh al-Sisi sits tight By M K Bhadrakumar

16 August 2013 — Asia Times

The highly opportunistic stance taken by the “big powers” who are veto-holding permanent members of the United Nations Security Council has prevented that august body from articulating an outright condemnation of the brutality with which the Egyptian military massacred more than 1,000 civilians in Cairo on Wednesday. 

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Egypt’s Junta Has Nothing to Lose By Melkulangara BHADRAKUMAR

16 August 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The appointment of Robert Ford as the new American ambassador to Egypt was indeed an ominous sign that the Obama administration expected civil war conditions to arise in Egypt. Ford’s forte during his hugely successful «diplomatic» assignment in Baghdad in the middle of the last decade was to organize the notorious death squads, which tore Mesopotamia apart and destroyed Iraq almost irreparably.

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U.S. Maintains Aid for Contractors in Egypt, Despite Massacre By Pratap Chatterjee

14 August 2013 — Corpwatch Blog

Combined Systems tear gas canisters retrieved by protestors from Tahrir Square. Photo: omarroberthamilton. Used under Creative Commons license

Egyptian security forces launched a massive crackdown on pro-democracy protestors killing around 300 people this morning. Despite near universal condemnation for the violence, the U.S. government has refused cut off the multi-billion dollar aid program that pays companies to provide support to the Egyptian government.

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‘Bloodbath that is not a bloodbath' following a coup that's not a coup By Pepe Escobar

15 August 2013 — RT

Stop. Look at the photos. Linger on dozens of bodies lined up in a makeshift morgue. How can the appalling bloodbath in Egypt be justified? Take your pick. Either it’s Egypt’s remix of Tiananmen Square, or it’s the bloodbath that is not a bloodbath, conducted by the leaders of the coup that is not a coup, with the aim of fighting “terror”. Egypt’s ‘bloodbath that is not a bloodbath’ has shown that the forces of hardcore suppression and corruption reign supreme, while foreign interests – the House of Saud, Israel and the Pentagon – support the military’s merciless strategy. Continue reading