Sleepwalking into fascism By William Bowles

2 January 2012

“[W]hen dealing with more old-fashioned kinds of states outside the postmodern continent of Europe, we need to revert to the rougher methods of an earlier era – force, pre-emptive attack, deception, whatever is necessary to deal with those who still live in the nineteenth century world of every state for itself. Among ourselves, we keep the law but when we are operating in the jungle, we must also use the laws of the jungle.” — The new liberal imperialism by Robert Cooper (Cooper by the way was a former civil service adviser to Tony Blair)[1]

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Been there – done that, so it’s time to do it all over again By William Bowles

9 October 2006

Victoria

If Queen Victoria was on the throne today I’m sure she would find the current situation comfortingly familiar and no doubt would be issuing proclamations about ‘our brave boys over there’ and the usual crop of medals would be flying out of her very royal hands along with all the usual platitudes about defending ‘civilisation’ against the heathen hordes ‘over there’.

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The Law of the Jungle – New Labour’s Version by William Bowles

10 May 2005

The challenge to the postmodern world is to get used to the idea of double standards. Among ourselves, we operate on the basis of laws and open cooperative security. But when dealing with more old-fashioned kinds of states outside the postmodern continent of Europe, we need to revert to the rougher methods of an earlier era – force, pre-emptive attack, deception, whatever is necessary to deal with those who still live in the nineteenth century world of every state for itself. Among ourselves, we keep the law but when we are operating in the jungle, we must also use the laws of the jungle. In the prolonged period of peace in Europe, there has been a temptation to neglect our defences, both physical and psychological. This represents one of the great dangers of the postmodern state.
The new liberal imperialism’, Robert Cooper

There could be no clearer example of the return to the age of imperialism than Cooper’s statement above, taken from an essay published in April 2002. Cooper, a former Foreign Office official was, and no doubt still is, one of Blair’s chief ideological advisors (Cooper was based in Afghanistan, then Iraq and then back in the EU as a military expert).

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CSI Baghdad By William Bowles

7 June 2004

The George Tenet affair illustrates the ‘wheels within wheels’ strategy of the propaganda war being waged over the abject failure that is the invasion and occupation of Iraq. And it’s a failure on two fronts: the failure of the invasion itself to establish a secure beachhead in the Middle East and the imperium’s failure to convince the world that ‘pre-emptive’ war has any justification.

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The Media’s Double Standard By William Bowles

14 November 2003

I’ve often referred to the strategy that is the core of the ‘new’ imperialist agenda, the so-called ‘double standard’ articulated by Robert Cooper, now Blair’s pro-consul in Afghanistan. And although cloaked in ‘post-modernist’ phraseology, effectively, it’s a rollback to an earlier, imperialist epoch, a time when the Western world went unchallenged, aside from the occasional ‘native’ uprising or squabble between competing empires over the loot.

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Let the reader be aware By William Bowles

8 October 2003

Location and photographer unknown

‘Repeat a lie often enough and it eventually becomes the truth.’

Oh what an irony that the ‘responsible’ press is so prone to quoting Goebbels’ famous line as if by saying it somehow cancels out the lies they tell us. It’s as if they’re telling us, ‘If, by some chance you should be on to us, this is our caveat emptor that lets us off the hook.’

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The personal versus the political By William Bowles

3 May 2003

‘Blair, unhinged’ We are shaped by history and in turn, history shapes us, at least that’s the theory. This morning on the radio(BBC Radio 4 ‘Today’ programme) the pundits were commenting on Tony Blair’s ‘messianic’ belief that what he was doing in invading Iraq was right and that he’d ‘squared’ his conscience ‘with his maker’, so that when he faced those he’d murdered and those who had died carrying out his orders, in the afterlife (or wherever), he’d be able to look them in the eye, his conscience clear. One of the pundits commented that in one TV programme he’d watched, before the invasion, where Blair was confronting his critics, he had an ‘unhinged look in his eyes’.

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