The Last Superpower Summits

23 January 2017 — National Security Archive

New book analyzes detailed transcripts of Gorbachev, Reagan and Bush meetings 1985-1991

Key documents show Thatcher’s endorsement of Gorbachev, Bush’s anxiety about Gorbachev’s popularity, and missed opportunities on arms control, regional conflicts, and European integration 

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 578

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Washington D.C., January 23, 2017 – The historic summit meetings between Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev and two U.S. presidents, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, built an intensive learning process on both sides that ended the Cold War, but missed numerous other opportunities to make the world safer, according to the new book, The Last Superpower Summits, featured today in the Washington History Seminar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

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NSA:: New book combines Soviet and U.S. transcripts of highest-level meetings that ended the Cold War

19 December 2016  — National Security Archive

Gorbachev offered arms race in reverse; Reagan recommended quiet on human rights; Bush sounded very encouraging in 1987 but the 1989 pause interrupted progress

The Last Superpower Summits publishes virtually every word Reagan, Gorbachev and Bush said to each other from 1985 through 1991

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 573

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Gorbachev’s Nuclear Initiative of January 1986 and the Road to Reykjavik

13 October 2016  — National Security Archive

Soviet nuclear abolition proposal in January 1986 welcomed by Reagan, set stage for historic Reykjavik summit and the INF Treaty 30 years ago

Gorbachev believed US dismissed idea as propaganda but declassified documents show major internal debate, consultations with allies, serious presidential support

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 563

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No, Putin Isn’t Following ‘Reagan Playbook’ in Ukraine–Thank God By Jim Naureckas

12 April 2014 — FAIR Blog 

David Ignatius (photo: CSIS)

David Ignatius

David Ignatius is a Washington Post columnist who is notable for his coziness with his sources in the CIA. So when he writes a column (4/8/14) headlined “Putin Steals the CIA’s Playbook on Anti-Soviet Covert Operations,” it’s hard to know how to take that: Is it supposed to be a criticism or a compliment?

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National Security Archive: The Able Archer 83 Sourcebook

7 November, 2013 — National Security Archive

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the beginning of Able Archer 83, a NATO exercise that utilized “new nuclear weapons release procedures” to simulate the transition from conventional to nuclear war with the Soviet Union.  Although US officials saw Able Archer 83 as a routine exercise, it resulted in an “unprecedented Soviet reaction” which US intelligence eventually inferred “was an expression of a genuine belief on the part of Soviet leaders that US was planning a nuclear first strike,” according to the largest collection of declassified documents on the 1983 War Scare compiled and posted by the National Security Archive, www.nsarchive.org.

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The Golden Dawn Murder Case: Larry Summers and the New Fascism By Greg Palast

7 October 2013 — Truthout

On September 18, hip-hop artist Pavlos Fyssas, a.k.a. Killah P, was stabbed outside a bar in Keratsini, Greece. 
 
Larry Summers has an air-tight alibi.  But I don’t believe it.
 
Larry didn’t hold the knife:  The confessed killer is some twisted member of Golden Dawn, a political party made up of skin-head freaks, anti-immigrant fear-mongers, anti-Muslim/ anti-Semitic/ anti-Albanian sociopaths and ultra-patriot fruitcakes.  Think of it as the Tea Party goes Greek.
 
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The Anti-Empire Report #117 By William Blum: What our presidents tell our young people

4 June, 2013 — Anti-Empire Report

What our presidents tell our young people

In this season of college graduations, let us pause to remember the stirring words of America’s beloved scholar, George W. Bush, speaking in Florida in 2007 at the commencement exercises of Miami Dade College: “In Havana and other Cuban cities, there are people just like you who are attending school, and dreaming of a better life. Unfortunately those dreams are stifled by a cruel dictatorship that denies all freedom in the name of a dark and discredited ideology.” 1

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Video: FAIR TV: PBS and Koch, Guatemala and the U.S. Role and Rumsfeld Meets the Press

25 May 2013 — FAIR Blog

This week: PBS won’t be showing us the documentary Citizen Koch–for some very dubious reasons. Also: The New York Times points out that the U.S. role in supporting genocide in Guatemala was hardly discussed at the trial; the same goes for U.S. media coverage of that trial. And Donald Rumsfeld goes on Meet the Press to talk about accountability. No, it’s not what you think.

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Bum Rap: The U.S. Role in Guatemalan Genocide By Peter Hart

21 May 2013 — FAIR Blog

I was struck by this May 17 headline in the New York Times:

Trial on Guatemalan Civil War Carnage Leaves Out U.S. Role

Reporter Elisabeth Malkin provides a pretty thorough accounting of U.S. support for Guatemalan dictator Efraín Ríos Montt. The “long history” of U.S. support for the brutal military went back to a CIA-backed coup in 1954, Malkin reported. She added:

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Guatemala's Ríos Montt Genocide Conviction: Omen for US Presidents and Their Hired Assassins By Jay Janson

18 May 2013 — Global Research 

Presiding Judge, “he knew about everything that was going on and he did not stop it, despite having the power to stop it from being carried out.” US President Ronald Reagan also had the power, greater power, to stop the massacres being perpetrated by dictator General and President Ríos Montt. Instead visited him in Guatemala City and praised Rios Montt as “a man of great personal integrity and commitment. Who was more guilty?

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