Boris Johnson walks away laughing with India’s Serum Institute in tow

4 May 2021 –Indian Punchline

M.K. Bhadrakumar

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson coming out of the Intensive Care Unit at St Thomas’ Hospital, London, April 9, 2020 (File photo) 

Three cheers for the Indian Supreme Court’s suo moto intervention on the issue of distribution of essential supplies and services during the pandemic. India, the “world pharmacy”, is entering shark-infested waters, as vaccine supply is getting intertwined with the country’s opaque decision-making, its powerful corporate culture and episodic diplomacy.

Continue reading

India’s “COVID outbreak” & the need for scientific integrity – not sensationalism

4 May 2021 — Off Guardian

Reality versus hysteria in latest fear fest

Colin Todhunter

Covid19 india

Western media outlets are currently paying a great deal of attention to India and the apparent impact of COVID-19. The narrative is that the coronavirus is ripping through the country – people are dying, cases are spiralling out of control and hospitals are unable to cope.

Continue reading

Good Law Project: Are you free next Tuesday, 11 May?

4 May 2021 —  Good Law Project

On Tuesday lunchtime, Good Law Project is hosting a defamation advice session for activists, organisations and campaigners.

We will provide tips about how you can best to protect yourself from publishing something (be that an article or social media post) that might leave you vulnerable to the threat of libel proceedings.

Continue reading

The Criminalization of Dissent

4 May 2021 — CJ Hopkins

CJ Hopkins

One of the hallmarks of totalitarian systems is the criminalization of dissent. Not just the stigmatization of dissent or the demonization of dissent, but the formal criminalization of dissent, and any other type of opposition to the official ideology of the totalitarian system. Global capitalism has been inching its way toward this step for quite some time, and now, apparently, it is ready to take it.

Continue reading

A Vaxxing Question

3 May 2021 — Off Guardian

Suzie Halewood

Dr Frances Kelsey receiving the President’s Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service from President Kennedy in 1962, for successfully preventing Thalidomide being approved for use in the USA.

In 1956 German pharmaceutical company Chemie Grünenthal GmbH, licensed a new experimental drug designed to treat colds, flu, nausea and morning sickness. Known as Distaval in the UK, Distillers Biochemicals Ltd declared the drug could ‘be given with complete safety to pregnant women and nursing mothers without adverse effect on mother or child’ – a basic pre-requisite for licensing a drug.

Continue reading