Watch UKC News: New Vaccine Death Claims, Trump Declassifies Russiagate

15 January 2021 — 

As the Government’s bold vaccine roll-out continues, more problems emerge regarding injury and death of people who’ve taken Pfizer’s experimental mRNA genetic COVID ‘vaccine’ – prompting [] China t[o] ban the jab. Meanwhile, the Government makes a power-play to censor media reporting – with the State agency now playing the role editor with major newspapers reporting COVID and lockdown, supposedly in the public interest.’ But what if the press regulator has their facts wrong? The NHS “clap” campaign seems to be bust after UKC sent its team across the country to look for any Thursday night clamour. Also, President Trump’s parting shot [at] the Democratic machine b[y] declassifying all of the FBI Russia probe document. All this and more.

Co-hosts Mike Robinson and Patrick Henningsen take a look at the end of week news round-up. Watch:

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War of the (Financial) Worlds

10 January, 2021 — TomDispatch

Or Let the Markets Go Wild While the People Go Down

Sometimes things only make sense when seen through a magnifying lens. As it happens, I’m thinking about reality, the very American and global reality clearly repeating itself as 2021 begins.

We all know, of course, that we’re living through a once-in-a-century-style pandemic; that millions of people have lost their jobs, a portion of which will never return; that the poorest among us, who can withstand such acute economic hardship the least, have been slammed the hardest; and that the global economy has been kneecapped, thanks to a battery of lockdowns, shutdowns, restrictions of various sorts, and health-related concerns. More sobering than all of this: more than 360,000 Americans (and counting) have already lost their lives as a result of Covid-19 with, according to public health experts, far more to come.

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Why did the world react so hysterically to covid?

3 January 2021 — Sebastian Rushworth

by Sebastian Rushworth, M.D.

Over the last few months, I’ve sought to demonstrate that covid is nowhere near as bad as it is portrayed by the mainstream media. I’ve written about how the mortality rate is below 0,2%, meaning that for most people the risk of dying if you get infected is less than one in 500 (and less than one in 3,000 if you’re below 70 years of age). I’ve also written about how the disease preferentially strikes people who are anyway very close to the end of life, so the amount of lifetime lost when someone dies of the disease is usually small. And I’ve noted that 2020 will likely turn out to have been a very average year in terms of overall mortality, in spite of the supposedly deadly pandemic that is currently raging.

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What is left to say?

30 December 2020 — Dr Malcolm Kendrick

Essay of the Year!

I have not written much about COVID19 recently. What can be said? In my opinion the world has simply gone bonkers. The best description can be found in Dante’s Inferno, written many hundreds of years ago.

In it, Dante describes the outcasts, who took no side in the rebellion of angels. They live in the vestibule. Not in heaven, not in hell, forever unclassified. They reside on the shores of the Acheron. Naked and futile, they race around through a hellish mist in eternal pursuit of an elusive, wavering banner, symbolic of their pursuit of ever-shifting self-interest.

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Covid Offices and the Religion of Remote Work

18 November 2020 — Counter Currents

by

Masks can prove liberating.  The hidden face affords security.  Obnoxious authority breathes better, hiding in comfort.  Behind the material, confidence finds a home.  While tens of millions of jobs have been lost to the novel coronavirus globally, security services, surveillance officers and pen pushers are thriving, policing admissions to facilities, churning through health and safety declarations, and generally making a nuisance of themselves.

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Exiting the false “jobs versus environment” dilemma

16 November, 2020 — ROAR

The workerist environmentalism of Italy’s Porto Marghera group connects the workplace and the community in the struggle against capitalist “noxiousness.”

Amidst the renewed rise of obscene inequalities, a wave of protests is sweeping through Italy, from south to north. On the one hand, the pandemic has engendered an upsurge in workplace disputes to defend health and in mobilizations to protect the income of workers affected by COVID-19-related restrictions. On the other hand, however, we have also witnessed successful interventions coordinated by the right and infused with a bewildering array of conspiracy theories in response to such measures.

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Covid: a curfew for what?

27 October 2020 — Voltaire Network

by Thierry Meyssan

The French were stunned to learn that their government considers a public order measure, a curfew, to be effective in preventing an epidemic. Everyone, having understood that no virus breaks according to schedules set by decree, and given the many previous mistakes, asks the angry question: A curfew for what?

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President Emmanuel Macron had chosen the star journalists of France2 and TF1, Anne-Sophie Lapix and Gilles Bouleau, to interview him on the Covid-19 epidemic. He announced a curfew to them as a health measure.

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A way to control COVID-19 (for now)

13 September 2020 — Dr Malcolm Kendrick

by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick

[Winter is coming]

In the flu pandemic at the end of World War One, the average age of death was twenty-eight [1]. In the UK, the average age of death from COVID19 is eighty-one for men, and eighty-four for women. Which is older than the average life expectancy in parts of the UK. These data are from the Office of National Statistics (ONS), as analysed and reported in the Daily Mail [2]. Continue reading