Imminent Dangers to Humanity: The Social Psychological Factor “Permitting” Nuclear War and Climate Change By Prof. Marc Pilisuk

26 December 2017 — Global Research

During  time of mourning or fear of grave existential threats, the human psyche is quite capable of denying and ignoring likely and imminent dangers. President Trump raised the prospect of venturing into a nuclear war with North Korea.  It is essential that some of us counter this propensity. In nuclear war there are blast, firestorm and  radiation effects and no first responders or infrastructure to assist the survivors. This is the time to face the prevention of the unthinkable.

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The Bombing of Nagasaki August 9, 1945: The Un-Censored Version By Dr. Gary G. Kohls

7 August 2013 — Global Research

68 years ago, at 11:02 am on August 9th, 1945, an all-Christian bomber crew dropped a plutonium bomb, on Nagasaki, Japan. That bomb was the second and last atomic weapon that had as its target a civilian city. Somewhat ironically, as will be elaborated upon later in this essay, Nagasaki was the most Christian city in Japan and ground zero was the largest cathedral in the Orient.

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Hiroshima and Nagasaki: American High School Textbooks Perpetuate The Big Lie By Pat Elder

2 August 2013 — War is a Crime

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: American High School Textbooks Perpetuate The Big Lie

hiroshima

This summer the world will pause to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.  Most Americans are still supportive of Truman’s decision despite overwhelming historical evidence the bomb had “nothing to do with the end of the war,” in the words of Major General Curtis E. LeMay.

 

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Depleted Uranium: The BBC’s John Simpson does a hatchet job on Fallujah’s genetically damaged children By William Bowles

1 April 2013 — William Bowles

Under the title ‘Fallujah’s childrens’ ‘genetic damage‘ that old war horse ‘literally’ of the BBC’s foreign propaganda service, John Simpson, manages not to mention the phrase ‘depleted uranium’ when allegedly reporting on the alarming rise in birth defects that include cancer, leukaemia and a horrific rise in child mortality since the US demolished the city of Fallujah in 2004. And it’s not until right at the end of the piece that the US attack on Fallujah is even mentioned, let alone depleted uranium!

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From the horse’s mouth

20 November 2012

If anyone has any doubts about the racist nature of Israeli society then the following quotes by Gilad Sharon, son of Ariel Sharon should clear the mist from your eyes:

“There should be no electricity in Gaza, no gasoline or moving vehicles, nothing. Then they’d really call for a ceasefire,” he wrote. “We need to flatten entire neighbourhoods in Gaza. Flatten all of Gaza” — Jerusalem Post

The Real Reason America Used Nuclear Weapons Against Japan. It Was Not To End the War Or Save Lives By Washington's Blog

14 October 2012 — Global Research – Washington’s Blog

Atomic Weapons Were Not Needed to End the War or Save Lives

Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives.

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The Criminality of Nuclear Deterrence Today: International Law as Anchoring Ground By Professor Francis A. Boyle

XVIIIth Conference “Mut Zur Ethic”: Direct Democracy Feldkirch, Austria

Ladies and gentlemen:

I am very happy to be speaking with you this evening. I want to express my gratitude to Zeit-Fragen for publishing the German language edition of my book The Criminality of Nuclear Deterrence (Clarity Press: 2002) which comes out now on the anniversary of the end of the Second World War. At this time 65 years ago, Japan surrendered to the United States after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the incineration of 250,000 completely innocent human beings.
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Japan urges ban on nukes 65 years after Nagasaki bombing

15 August, 2010 — RT Top Stories

The Japanese city of Nagasaki has remembered those killed by the second atom bomb dropped by the US in 1945. A minute of silence was observed on Monday to commemorate the moment when the bomb wiped out most of the city.

Tens of thousands of people were incinerated instantly as the bomb nicknamed ‘Fat Man’ buried the city under an explosion, with many more dying from diseases linked to radiation ever since.

Those who survived the attack say it was unjustifiably cruel and insist on a universal ban on nuclear weapons.

Sixty-five years ago Sumiteru Taniguchi was enjoying a simple morning bicycle ride when, in a tragic instant, his life changed forever.

‘I was thrown to the ground and I heard an ear-piercing sound,’ Sumiteru recalled. ‘I thought I had been killed, but I encouraged myself not to die, that it was important to go on living.’

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