Gorbachev’s legacy: Russia’s 9/11 or Let a hundred weeds bloom

9 August 2019 — Eric Walberg

Perestroika is like an airplane that takes off without knowing where it will land. (Bondarev)

Reading Taubman’s exhaustive biography of Gorbachev, Mikhail Sergeevich, I was rivetted time and again, marvelling (as did Shultz and everyone who cared): how did this guy get from collective farm winner of the Red Banner of Labour to the top? My first question in reading a bio is ‘would I like to have this person as a friend?’, then ‘would I like to be him?’ Gorbachev gets a firm Nyet on both. But he’s important and pleasant, and this 700-page bio is full of real characters acting out a drama of Shakespearian dimensions.

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“The Lesson of the Soviet Union Is that the Bureaucracy Chooses Capitalist Restoration”

5 June 2019 — Global Research

By Eric Toussaint and Wilder Pérez Varona

Wilder Pérez Varona (WPV): My first question to you is about the issue of bureaucracy.

Before 1917 the issue of the socialist transition is one thing. The 1848 Revolution, the Paris Commune (which is a crucial episode, but of a momentary nature) were always limited to matters of theory, principles, projections (we know that Marx and Engels were reluctant to be very detailed about these projections). The Revolution of 1917 placed this problem of transition in another way, on to a different level; a level that involved essentially practical elements. One of them involved the issue of bureaucracy, which gradually appeared throughout the 1920s. On the issue of bureaucracy as it was being developed in those circumstances, how do you define the function of bureaucracy by according it an autonomous role of such a relevant actor at the level of the class triad: the working class / peasantry and the bourgeoisie? Why this important place? I would also like you to say something on the distinctness of “class”. You are cautious to talk about the bureaucracy as a class; however, other authors do.

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Did The West “Finish” With Russia? by Vladislav B. SOTIROVIĆ

7 February 2019 — Oriental Review

After the end of the Soviet Union in 1991, Russia was becoming a less popular area of studying and dealing with in comparison before the end of the Cold War. In the West, it was believed that after 1991 Russia was simply “finished” as Moscow was not anymore the capital of a Great Power state which had an important influence in global politics and international relations. In other words, the Western policymakers thought that after 1991 Russia would remain irrelevant as both economic and political power in global politics and, therefore, for instance, many university’s studies programs on Russia in the USA and West Europe were either canceled or downsized under the explanation that studying Russia was no longer important.

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A Strategy of War Crimes, Killing Civilians to Win a War – Daniel Ellsberg on RAI (10/12

21 November 2018 — TRNN

General Curtis LaMay, who directed the firebombing and nuclear attacks on Japan said, “War is killing people, when you kill enough of them, the other guy quits” – quotes Daniel Ellsberg on Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay (inc. transcript).

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NSA: Tommy Thompson The Kremlinologist

November 19 2018 — National Security Archive

National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 648

Washington D.C., November 19, 2018 – Today, the National Security Archive is publishing a set of documents to commemorate the life and achievements of long-time diplomat and presidential adviser Llewellyn Thompson and highlight the publication of a biography of him written by his daughters, Jenny Thompson and Sherry Thompson, The Kremlinologist: Llewellyn E. Thompson, America’s Man in Cold War Moscow (Johns Hopkins Nuclear History and Contemporary Affairs, 2018).  The posting includes never-before-published translations of Russian memcons with Khrushchev and Thompson’s cables from Moscow.

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The Discovery That Should Have Changed the Cold War – Daniel Ellsberg on RAI (9/12)

19 November 2018 — TRNN

In 1958 President Kennedy claimed there was a “missile gap”, saying the USSR was far ahead in ICBM weapons; when satellite photos showed the astounding true number, it meant the USSR did not have plans for global domination, but it remained a secret, says Daniel Ellsberg on Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay

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Russian “Doomsday Machine” an Answer to U.S. Decapitation Strategy – Daniel Ellsberg on RAI (5/8)

5 November 2018 — TRNN

Russian “Doomsday Machine” an Answer to U.S. Decapitation Strategy - Daniel Ellsberg on RAI (5/8)

The U.S. military still thinks that a nuclear war can be won by targeting Russian leadership in a bizarre Dr. Strangelove logic; it’s a recipe for unmitigated catastrophe, says Daniel Ellsberg on Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay (inc. transcript)

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Truman Delayed End of WWII to Demonstrate Nuclear Weapons – Daniel Ellsberg on RAI (3/8)

2 November 2018 — TRNN

To intimidate the Soviet Union and prove to Congress the nuclear program should be funded, Truman dropped nuclear weapons on Japan to end the war; no scientist came forward to warn of the dangers to life on earth, says Daniel Ellsberg on Reality Asserts Itself with Paul Jay (inc. transcript)

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