Allende and Chile: ‘Bring Him Down’

3 November 2020 — Origin: National Security Archive

Salvador Allende’s Historic Inauguration 50 Years Later

Declassified White House Records Show How Nixon-Kissinger Set Strategy of Destabilization—And Why

Washington D.C., November 3, 2020 — Several days after Salvador Allende’s history-changing November 3, 1970, inauguration, Richard Nixon convened his National Security Council for a formal meeting on what policy the U.S. should adopt toward Chile’s new Popular Unity government. Only a few officials who gathered in the White House Cabinet Room knew that, under Nixon’s orders, the CIA had covertly tried, and failed, to foment a preemptive military coup to prevent Allende from ever being inaugurated. The SECRET/SENSITIVE NSC memorandum of conversation revealed a consensus that Allende’s democratic election and his socialist agenda for substantive change in Chile threatened U.S. interests, but divergent views on what the U.S. could, and should do about it.  “We can bring his downfall, perhaps, without being counterproductive,” suggested Secretary of State William Rogers, who opposed overt hostility and aggression toward Chile.  “We have to do everything we can to hurt [Allende] and bring him down,” agreed the secretary of defense, Melvin Laird.

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The U.S. 12-Step Method to Conduct Regime Change By Vijay Prashad

2 February 2019 — CommonDreams

On September 15, 1970, U.S. President Richard Nixon and National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger authorized the U.S. government to do everything possible to undermine the incoming government of the socialist president of Chile, Salvador Allende. Nixon and Kissinger, according to the notes kept by CIA Director Richard Helms, wanted to “make the economy scream” in Chile; they were “not concerned [about the] risks involved.” War was acceptable to them as long as Allende’s government was removed from power. The CIA started Project FUBELT, with $10 million as a first installment to begin the covert destabilization of the country.

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National Security Archive 31 July 2015: Los Quemados: Chile’s Pinochet Covered up Human Rights Atrocity

31 July 2015 — National Security Archive

Los Quemados: Chile’s Pinochet Covered up Human Rights Atrocity

Chilean Dictator Rejected Police Report Identifying Army Units which Burned Alive Teenage Protesters in 1986

Declassified Documents Could Provide Evidence in long-awaited Prosecution for Murder of Washington D.C. Resident Rodrigo Rojas, Burning of Carmen Quintana
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And For Everything Else…

2 February 2015 — The Wolf Report: Nonconfidential analysis for the anti-investor

…there’s Mastercard.  The Telegraph is reporting that Greece’s Finance Ministry has hired the investment banking group Lazard to advise it on issues of debt and fiscal policy.

Those of you who are old enough will remember  Allende bringing into his cabinet three senior military officers.  These officers were co-opted in order to placate the bourgeoisie after their counterrevolutionary attempt at a nationwide lockout  had  been defeated by the spontaneous and self-organized resistance of the Chilean workers.

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The Question of US ‘Democracy Promotion’ in the Newspaper of Record By Peter Hart

26 February 2014 — FAIR Blog

Statue of Salvador Allende in a Viennese park (cc photo: Sebastian Baryli )

You might ask Chilean President Salvador Allende what he thinks about US democracy promotion–if he hadn’t been killed in a CIA-backed coup in 1973. (cc photo: Sebastian Baryli )

Sometimes the thing we call “media bias” isn’t about what a given piece of journalism explicitly says about the world;  it’s more about the assumptions that must be taken for granted. Question those assumptions and the whole thing starts to fall apart. 

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In an age of 'realists' and vigilantes, there is cause for optimism By John Pilger

19 September 2013 — John Pilger

The most important anniversary of the year was the 40th anniversary of 11 September 1973 – the crushing of the democratic government of Chile by General Augusto Pinochet and Henry Kissinger, then US secretary of state. The National Security Archive in Washington has posted new documents that reveal much about Kissinger’s role in an atrocity that cost thousands of lives. 

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