Egyptian revolutionary socialist: ‘We are facing a counterrevolution’

23 December 2013 — Links International Journal of Socialist Renewal

Rana Nessim and Rosemary Bechler interviewed Sameh Naguib (pictured below), a leading member of the Revolutionary Socialists in Egypt, on October 24, 2013. The interview was published on the openDemocracy website on November 8. Nessim is associate editor for openDemocracy’s Arab Awakening page. Bechler is editor of openDemocracyLinks International Journal of Socialist Renewal has added subheads and abridged the interview for reasons of space. The full text is available at HERE. Continue reading

‘Bloodbath that is not a bloodbath' following a coup that's not a coup By Pepe Escobar

15 August 2013 — RT

Stop. Look at the photos. Linger on dozens of bodies lined up in a makeshift morgue. How can the appalling bloodbath in Egypt be justified? Take your pick. Either it’s Egypt’s remix of Tiananmen Square, or it’s the bloodbath that is not a bloodbath, conducted by the leaders of the coup that is not a coup, with the aim of fighting “terror”. Egypt’s ‘bloodbath that is not a bloodbath’ has shown that the forces of hardcore suppression and corruption reign supreme, while foreign interests – the House of Saud, Israel and the Pentagon – support the military’s merciless strategy. Continue reading

Egypt: The officers’ war of terror; latest statements from the Egyptian left

27 July, 2013 — Jadaliyya

Since the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak, Egypt has become a battlefield of narratives. Each narrative has sought to appropriate and define the January 25 Revolution. The wielders of power, most notably the army, along with its allies, advanced a narrative claiming that the revolution succeeded—thanks to the intervention of the officers. Continue reading

Egypt: Staging a “Democratic” Military Coup By Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich

10 July 2013 —  Global Research

During the 2011 Egyptian uprisings, the military was jeered for cracking down on protestors and for the infamous virginity tests they conducted on detained female protestors. In June 2012, when Mohamed Morsi won the presidential race with 51% of the votes, crowds gathered in Tahrir Square to celebrate his victory, chanting : “God is great” and “down with military rule.“ Barely a year passed before the crowds were cheering the U.S.-backed military for ousting their first democratically elected president in a coup dubbed by various media outlets as a democratic coup. What transpired?

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Class Warfare in Egypt By By SEAN F. McMAHON

10 July 2013 — Greanville Post

State Capital Wins Again

egyptmideast_egypt-3 Cairo – Egypt is at war. More accurately, Egypt is experiencing yet another battle in its ongoing class war. The battle is so fierce because the primary combatants are the two most powerful social forces in Egypt, both factions of the capitalist class – the military as the state capitalist class and the Ikhwan (the Muslim Brotherhood) representing the competitive capitalist class.

Neither Coup nor Revolution? Egypt’s US-Backed Deep State Reasserts Control By Finian CUNNINGHAM

9 July 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The numbers and claims are conflicting, but it seems that the Egyptian army has indeed committed a cold-blooded massacre – killing between 30 and 54 people and wounding hundreds more, including children, in the capital, Cairo, according to various media sources. The bloodshed pushes the North African country to the brink of civil war, already roiled by weeks of violence, with dozens dead in street clashes between opposing political factions, that culminated last week in the country’s army deposing the elected Islamist president, Mohamed Morsi… 

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The Protest Movement in Egypt: “Dictators” do not Dictate, They Obey Orders By Prof Michel Chossudovsky

6 July, 2013 – 29 January 2011 — Global Research

egypt_reuters_wide july 2013

Egypt is currently at a dangerous crossroads which could evolve towards a civil war.

It is important to understand Washington’s role, which is carried out by the Pentagon and US intelligence.

While the Armed Forces have cracked down on the Muslim Brotherhood,  the Coup d’Etat is ultimately intended to manipulate the protest movement and prevent the accession of a “real people’s government”. 

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Can the NYT Call a Coup a Coup? By Peter Hart

6 July 2013 — FAIR Blog

“A Coup? Or Something Else?”  is the question a New York Times headline is posing today (7/5/13) about the U.S. government’s response to the military’s removal of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi. It’s not just a question of semantics;  U.S. law seems to require suspending aid to Egypt in case of a coup. That’s why the government might not want to call it one.

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America’s Plan B in Egypt: Bring Back the Old Regime By Mahdi Darius NAZEMROAYA

6 July 2013 — Strategic Culture Foundation

The road that has been taken in Egypt is a dangerous one. A military coup has taken place in Egypt while millions of Egyptians have cheered it on with little thought about what is replacing the Muslim Brotherhood and the ramifications it will have for their society. Many people in cheering crowds have treated the Egyptian military’s coup like it was some sort of democratic act. Continue reading

Egypt's revolution betrayed: Fuel for al-Qaeda fires By Eric Walberg

5 July 2013 — Eric Walberg

During the past few months, dozens of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood (MB) members have been murdered and their offices sacked and burned. The police openly refuse to protect them. Rather than ordering the opposition to drop their demand that Egypt’s first democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi, resign, and negotiate reasonably with his government, the army gave him a Hobson’s Choice: resign or be ousted. Continue reading