History Will Absolve Me: Fidel Castro, Sixty Years Later By Maximilian Forte

17 October 2013 — Zero Anthropology

fidel_cuba_7

Today marks the 60th anniversary of Fidel Castro’s famous “History Will Absolve Me” speech, given in his defense during his trial following the unsuccessful guerrilla attack on the Moncada barracks on July 26 of that year.

The complete speech, which was transcribed after the fact entirely from memory, is available here in English and aquí en Castellano, and below I am highlighting certain extracts which I think are still critically relevant today.

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Eviction Brixton: creating housing insecurity in London By Hannah Schling

22 July 2013 — Open Security

The marketisation of access to housing security is central to the increasingly normative experience of housing precarity in London. Lambeth Council’s eviction of long-term squatted and short-life housing co-op communities is pouring fuel onto the fire: making people homeless to clear the way for public housing stock sell-offs.

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CCR Says: This is Your Victory: End Stop and Frisk Today

13 August 2013 — Center for Constitutional Rights

[It’s great to know, that every once in awhile, we, that is, we the People, achieve a significant victory over the forces of repression and reaction. And CCR’s legal battle to overturn ‘stop and frisk’ in NYC reminds me that back in 1980, the equivalent law here in the UK was called the “Suss Law” and its use against people of colour by the Met police eventually triggered riots that saw cities burn. The Suss Law was eventually repealed only to be re-instated (conveniently) by the phony ‘war on terror’ and used to stop hundreds of thousands of people, with virtually no ‘terror’ arrests. WB]

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Egypt: The officers’ war of terror; latest statements from the Egyptian left

27 July, 2013 — Jadaliyya

Since the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak, Egypt has become a battlefield of narratives. Each narrative has sought to appropriate and define the January 25 Revolution. The wielders of power, most notably the army, along with its allies, advanced a narrative claiming that the revolution succeeded—thanks to the intervention of the officers. Continue reading