Listen: Uncovering the CIA: Whistleblower Philip Agee interviewed with John Marks (1976)

31 October, 2021 — 21st Century Wire

Philip Agee was a former Central Intelligence Agency officer who turned into one of the agency’s most vocal critics, and who exposed the inner workings of Unites States regime change and destablizations operations all over the world. During his nearly four decades in the intelligence game, Agee became disillusioned with his work for the agency, and later went on to publish numerous books including “Inside the Company: CIA Diary” (1975) which infuriated US officials after identifying some 250 officers, front companies and foreign agents working for the CIA. Agee passed away in Havana, Cuba in 2008. During his activist career, Agee inspired a new wave of publications including Covert Action Information Bulletin, as well as numerous films detailing the clandestine exploits of the American deep state. 

Continue reading

How to Find a Tiger in Africa: Searching for Agostinho Neto (1922 –1979) By T.P. Wilkinson

18 September 2019 — Black Agenda Report

How to Find a Tiger in Africa: Searching for Agostinho Neto (1922 –1979)
The history of liberated Angola, like the history of the world, cannot be told by humanity’s oppressors.

“In the jargon of the ‘West,’ anyone called a communist who becomes a head of state must be a dictator.”

What I want to do here is something very simple. I want to explain how I began to search for Agostinho Neto. I also want to explain the perspective that shapes this search.[i]

Continue reading

Video: The Secret History of How Cuba Helped End Apartheid in South Africa

11 December 2013 — Democracy Now!

As the world focuses on Tuesday’s historic handshake between President Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro, we look back at the pivotal role Cuba played in ending apartheid and why Castro was one of only five world leaders invited to speak at Nelson Mandela’s memorial. In the words of Mandela, the Cubans ‘destroyed the myth of the invincibility of the white oppressor … [and] inspired the fighting masses of South Africa.’ Historian Piero Gleijeses argues that it was Cuba’s victory in Angola in 1988 that forced Pretoria to set Namibia free and helped break the back of apartheid South Africa. We speak to Gleijeses about his new book, “Visions of Freedom: Havana, Washington, Pretoria, and the Struggle for Southern Africa, 1976-1991,” and play archival footage of Mandela meeting Fidel Castro in Cuba.

Continue reading

FOIA Sourcing: Cuban Intervention in Angola By Lauren Harper

2 November 2013 — Unredacted

Lobito Lighthouse 1995. Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

In November 1975 while Angola was battling for independence and internal and external forces were competing for primacy, Cuban forces militarily intervened in support of the leftist MPLA movement and against US-supported movements.“By the end of 1975 the Cuban military in Angola numbered more than 25,000 troops. Following the retreat of Zaire and South Africa, Cuban forces remained in Angola to support the MPLA government against UNITA in the continuing Angolan Civil War.” Continue reading

CIA Manipulation: The Painful Truths Told by Phil Agee By William Blum

27 June, 2013 — Anti-Empire Report

Truly objective journalism would value facts and accuracy above all else, but the mainstream U.S. press – while pretending to be “objective” – treasures faux patriotism much more, as is evident with recent whistleblowers as it was with the hostility toward the late Phil Agee who exposed CIA crimes.

Continue reading

Black Agenda Report for May 1, 2013: NY Times Slanders Black Farmers, Crushed By Capitalism, Death in Somalia

1 May 2013 — Black Agenda Report

This week in Black Agenda Report

Breitbart Lives? New York Times & Slate.com Do Sloppy Racist Hatchet Job on Black Farmers Lawsuit

By BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

On Friday, April 26, the New York Times, with an assist from the Washington Post property Slate.com committed a journalistic atrocity with a false and misleading portrayal of the lawsuit launched by black farmers against the USDA. Continue reading

PAMBAZUKA NEWS 558 18 November 2011: ANGOLAN CORRUPTION, THE CLIMATE CRISIS AND ELECTIONS IN DRC

18 November 2011 — Pambazuka News (English edition): ISSN 1753-6839

The authoritative electronic weekly newsletter and platform for social justice in Africa

CONTENTS:
1. Features, 2. Announcements, 3. Comment & analysis, 4. Advocacy & campaigns, 5. Pan-African Postcard, 6. Letters & Opinions, 7. African Writers’ Corner, 8. Highlights French edition

Continue reading

William Blum: Anti-Empire Report, Number 63

Read this or George W. Bush will be president the rest of your life

October 30, 2008
www.killinghope.org

Don’t tell my mother I work at the White House. She thinks I play the piano in a whore house.

The Republican presidential campaign has tried to make a big issue of Barack Obama at one time associating with Bill Ayers, a member of the 1960s Weathermen who engaged in political bombings. Governor Palin has accused Obama of ‘palling around with terrorists’, although Ayers’ association with the Weathermen during their period of carrying out anti-Vietnam War bombings in the United States took place when Obama was around 8-years-old. Contrast this with who President Ronald Reagan, so beloved by the Republican candidates, associated with. Gulbuddin Hekmatyar was an Afghan warlord whose followers first gained attention by throwing acid in the faces of women who refused to wear the veil. This is how they spent their time when they were not screaming ‘Death to America‘. CIA and State Department officials called Hekmatyar ‘scary,’ ‘vicious,’ ‘a fascist,’ ‘definite dictatorship material’.[1] None of this prevented the Reagan administration from inviting the man to the White House to meet with Reagan, and showering him with large amounts of aid to fight against the Soviet-supported government of Afghanistan.

Continue reading

Gerald Horne: "Solidarity Forever?"

No Easy Victories

A review of ‘No Easy Victories: African Liberation and American Activists over a Half Century, 1950-2000′ William Minter, Gail Hovey, and Charles Cobb, Jr., eds.

This is a remarkable and often insightful collection of essays and reflections, many of which have been penned by those who played leading roles in the dramatic story of how a conservative hegemon — the United States — was compelled to retreat somewhat in its support for colonialism and apartheid during the second half of the twentieth century. The numerous photographs alone make this book well worth the price and underscores how this book, inter alia, is a valuable document.

It is because of this book that I came to discover that a man I have known as a friend — Robert Van Lierop, the attorney and filmmaker who produced the wonderful documentary, A Luta Continua (1971) — had a grandfather who had participated in the so-called Boer War over one century ago in South Africa, while his father, who was a merchant seaman, visited there. The Van Lierops, who are of Surinamese descent, are worthy of a book all their own, yet for the time being his contribution to this worthy volume must suffice.

Continue reading

It’s a Proxy World -Reporting the War in Angola By William Bowles

Extra!   — Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting – November/December 1988

In March of this year South Africa suffered a momentus military defeat at Cuito Cuanavale in southeastern Angola at the hands of Cuban and Angolan forces. Described by the Christian Science Monitor (3-3-88) as “South Africa’s Stalingrad,” this battle belied earlier reports of the “dwindling resistance” of the Angolan Army and its “Soviet Bloc advisers” (Washington Post, 1-27-88).

Continue reading