National Security Archive: The Able Archer 83 Sourcebook

7 November, 2013 — National Security Archive

Today marks the 30th anniversary of the beginning of Able Archer 83, a NATO exercise that utilized “new nuclear weapons release procedures” to simulate the transition from conventional to nuclear war with the Soviet Union.  Although US officials saw Able Archer 83 as a routine exercise, it resulted in an “unprecedented Soviet reaction” which US intelligence eventually inferred “was an expression of a genuine belief on the part of Soviet leaders that US was planning a nuclear first strike,” according to the largest collection of declassified documents on the 1983 War Scare compiled and posted by the National Security Archive, www.nsarchive.org.

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Police State UK: US, UK governments defend police-state spying By Patrick Martin

4 November 2013 — WSWS

Are we living in a police state or what?

“[T]he disclosure [of Documents], or threat of disclosure, is designed to influence a government and is made for the purpose of promoting a political or ideological cause. This therefore falls within the definition of terrorism.” – Scotland Yard

The US and British governments have stepped up their campaign of repression and victimization against Edward Snowden and his allies for exposing the worldwide police-state spying by the US National Security Agency and the British GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters).

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Police State UK: New threats against the Guardian newspaper and Snowden in Westminster debate By Chris Marsden

2 November 2013 — WSWS

Wednesday’s debate in parliament’s Westminster Hall on oversight of Britain’s intelligence services was meant as a rebuttal to that initiated last week by Conservative MP Julian Smith on whether the Guardian had endangered national security by publishing surveillance leaks from Edward Snowden.

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Police State UK: ‘Press handling with talking heads’: Snowden files reveal enormous GCHQ efforts to escape legal challenge

26 October 2013 — RT

The UK’s spy agency GCHQ was doing whatever it could to avoid igniting a “damaging public debate” and a subsequent possibility of a legal threat over its surveillance practices and cooperation with telecoms, new Snowden papers reveal.

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“Intelligence Led Surveillance” and Britain’s Police State: The Manufacture of “Mass Surveillance by Consent” By Charles Farrier

16 October 2013 — Global Research

british empire

Is mass surveillance so bad if you can’t see it?

In the dark ages known as the twentieth century, mass surveillance of entire populations was a sport practised only by elitist totalitarian states . Those unlucky enough to live in what was then termed a “free country”, had to sit on the sidelines and simply imagine what it was like to be subject to constant state intrusion.

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NYT's Iraq War History, Still Misleading By Peter Hart

16 October 2013 — FAIR Blog

nyt-oustedThe New York Times had an interesting piece on October 14 telling the story of José Bustani, the former director general of the intergovernmental Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, who was ousted by the United States as part of the run up to the Iraq War.

As the story goes (and was reported at the time), Bustani had been working on getting Iraq  to agree to join the Chemical Weapons Convention. This was an unwelcome development for the Bush administration, since it could complicate efforts to invade Iraq based in part on its chemical weapons stockpile.

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