UN Anti-Nazi Resolution 10 Year Anniversary: Syria, Israel and North Korea Support It, US Adamantly Opposes It By Carla Stea

18 November 2017 — Global Research

Throughout the past decade, the UN General Assembly Third Committee has adopted the resolution: “Combating Glorification of Nazism, neo-Nazism and other practices that contribute to fueling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance.”

Every year the resolution is adopted by an overwhelming majority of UN member states, while the European Union, which, as the battleground of Nazism should have supported the resolution, merely abstains, and their fence-straddling raises disturbing questions about their actual tendencies. Japan’s abstention raises equally disturbing questions. The United States has consistently, and shockingly, opposed this resolution.

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W.W.I: The War That Begat Another By Eve Ottenberg

2 March 2012 — In These Times

Who gets to write a war’s history determines how it is viewed for generations. But in the case of World War I, one of the best accounts of the milieu that triggered the conflict was a novel — or three, to be exact: John Dos Passos‘ trilogy, U.S.A., published in the 1930s. Any attempt to understand the war since has had to contend, directly or indirectly, with the granite truth of Dos Passos‘ objections to the flood of blood unleashed by that immense and needless slaughter.

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The Class War in Europe by Steve McGiffen, Ed Lewis

13 February 2012 — New Left Project

Steve McGiffen has had a long involvement with left politics in Europe. He is a former official of the United European Left Group in the European Parliament and has been associated in various capacities with the Socialist Party of the Netherlands since 1999. He is also the editor Spectrezine. He spoke to Ed Lewis about the class politics driving both the euro and the ever-deepening austerity in Europe, Neo-Nazism in Greece, and how to frame a left response to the EU.  

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New on Strategic Culture Foundation 2-8 July 2011: China / NATO / Nazism / Canada / Lithuania

8 July 2011 — Strategic Culture Foundation

No Point in Discarding State Capitalism (I)

08.07.2011 | 15:42 | Alexander SALITZKI
It is common knowledge that the past three decades highlighted the fundamental advantages of modern Asia’s pattern of economic progress. The pattern can be defined as a combination of the modernization imperative and the practice of state capitalism. The approach produced excellent result in South Korea’s, Taiwan’s, and Singapore’s fight against poverty and underdevelopment, then was adopted by newly industrializing countries including China…
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Italy, Germany and Japan: Former World War II Axis Nations Repudiate Bans against “Preparing for War” By Rick Rozoff

13 August, 2009 — Global ResearchStop NATO

A press report on August 10 revealed that the government of Italy is planning to modify if not dispense with its post-World War II constitutional limitations on conducting offensive military operations; that is, to reverse a 61-year ban on waging war.

The news story, reminding readers that “Italy’s post-World War II constitution places stringent limits on the country’s military engagements,” stated the Italian government intends to introduce a new military code “specifically for missions abroad,” one that – in a demonstration of evasiveness and verbal legerdemain alike – would be “neither of peace nor of war.” [1]

On August 10 and 11, respectively, the nation’s Defense Minister Ignazio La Russa and Foreign Minister Franco Frattini were interviewed in the daily Corriere della Sera in in tandem they bemoaned what they described as undue restrictions on the Italian armed forces in performing their combat roles in NATO’s war in Afghanistan.

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The Final Solution is a No-State Solution By William Bowles

27 January 2009

It was either in 1941 or maybe 1942 that the Nazis implemented the ‘Final Solution’, the extermination of all ‘non-Aryan’ peoples that included not only the Jews but also the Roma and the Serbs. So the term Holocaust is not copyright © the Jewish ‘race’ in spite of their appropriation of the Upper case.

The numbers are not important, let the historians and researchers argue over whether it was five or six million Jews or whether it was half-a-million or two million Roma who ‘went up the chimney’[1] (I don’t have a number for the Serbs, but perhaps a million died at the hands of the Croatian Ustase, the local Nazis in the then Yugoslavia, as well as at the hands of German Nazi occupiers).

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