David Chappelle’s ‘Space Jews’

9 October 2021 — Eric Walberg

Written by Eric Walberg Эрик Вальберг/ Уолберг إيريك والبرغ

Finally someone, male or female, white or whatever, str8 or lgbtq+, with the balls to give Israel the finger in the mainstream media. Chappelle is the American Hamas, lobbing his homemade rockets, flying his balloons out of besieged America at the dastardly foe, which relentless steals and then colonizes our minds, forcing us to our knees to atone for our inbred antisemitism.

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Is lab-grown meat the future of food?

18 July, 2020 — Climate & Capitalism

Film review

Documentary on ‘clean meat’  fails to question the technology’s rationale and blindly accepts dubious claims made by its promoters


Australian ecosocialist Alan Broughton is is a member of the Organic Agriculture Association and co-author of Sustainable Agriculture vs Corporate Greed.


MEAT THE FUTURE
Directed by Liz Marshall

reviewed by Alan Broughton
Green Left, July 6, 2020

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REVIEW: Planet of the Humans Michael Moore produced documentary on The Green New Deal lands the occasional hit, but pulls too many punches

3 May 2020 — Off Guardian

John Steppling

Michael Moore is estimated to be worth 50 million dollars. He is a wealthy man. His political support is for the Democratic Party. He has stumped for Alexandria Ocasio Cortez in New York and for Rashida Tlaib in Michigan (does one need to say more?). Moore is essentially a brand.

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Movie Review: The struggle to live in the present

25 October 2019 — MROnline

wark_extract_photo-.jpgOriginally published: Verso by McKenzie Wark (October 18, 2019)

Many of my friends disliked it, and not without reason. And yet Raoul Peck’s film The Young Karl Marx seemed to me to get the essential thing right.1 I saw it as a film about the struggle to live in the present. As such, it’s a film that can help us do exactly that. The Young Karl Marx is fiction, but like all good fiction is more real than the documentary evidence on which it is based. It tells us not what actually happened, but a version of what happened with which to think what is happening now. In that sense, it is a species of realism.2 And in another sense too. It is a work of cinema. It is in Pasolini’s terms (and Barad’s also) cut from the real itself.

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XY Chelsea: A deeply flawed portrait of US Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning By Jean Shaoul

4 June 2019 — WSWS

Directed by Tim Travers Hawkins; written by Mark Monroe

XY Chelsea, directed by Tim Travers Hawkins, charts the life of former United States Army soldier Chelsea Manning, following President Barack Obama’s unexpected commutation in January 2017 of her vindictive 35-year jail sentence.

Manning had served seven years, much of it in solitary confinement, in a military prison for leaking classified war logs and diplomatic cables to WikiLeaks, which passed them on to the mainstream media outlets. The documents and video clips exposed the criminal operations carried out during the illegal US wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, spying operations on foreign heads of state and ordinary people and sordid intrigues in every corner of the globe. Not one official responsible for the crimes she exposed—including mass murder, government spying and torture—has been prosecuted, let alone jailed.

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Could this be the most Marxist film ever made?

14 May 2019 — MROnline – The Public Autonomy Project by Steve Darcy (May 8, 2019)

Boots Riley’s masterpiece of socialist cinema — Sorry to Bother You — may be the most self-consciously marxist film ever made. It is an exhortation to rebel, but to do so with our eyes open, with ‘sober senses,’ so we don’t replicate uncritically the logics that we aspire to contest.

[Note: this contains some plot spoilers.]

Those who avoided reading Karl Marx’s three-volume, 2,500 page magnum opus, Capital, in the improbable expectation that someday a movie version would come out, have finally got their wish. Boots Riley’s film, Sorry to Bother You, may indeed be the most marxist film ever made.

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US ‘Stumbled Into Torture,’ Says NYT Reporter By Adam Johnson

15 February 2018 — FAIR

NYT: That Time the C.I.A. Tried to Recruit Me

Jennifer Lawrence does not actually come up in New York Times reporter Scott Shane’s reminiscence (2/14/18).

As part of a promotion for the upcoming “Look, Evil Russians!” film Red Sparrow (hyping Hollywood films is apparently a thing reporters do now), New York Times national security reporter Scott Shane (2/14/18) wrote a synergistic Cold War 2.0 essay about the CIA’s alleged attempt to recruit him. It included a rather jarring—if not risible—paragraph summarizing Shane’s years of reporting: Continue reading

John Pilger – The Power of Documentary – Selected life works at the British Library

9 November 2017 — John PilgerThe British Library

John Pilger’s films have been credited with drawing public attention to human rights crises, the impacts of wars and abuses of power by governments and corporations.

John will be speaking on both days. Due to demand, tickets are now bookable for single or half days or for the whole weekend:

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Ritzy staff strike for a living wage for the fifth time!

7 October 2016 — Momentum

[To tell the truth, I’m not a big fan of Momentum, or indeed any of the other ‘Corbynista’ support groups, websites, pr agencies, boosters and hangers-0n. Have I missed anything? But I like to keep my eye on things and as the Ritzy Cinema in Brixton is kinda my ‘local’, I actually know a few of the people in the photo below and remember the last time they struck the Picturehouse chain of cinemas. I mean, in London, you can’t even survive on a so-called London living wage. It should be called the ‘existing wage’, and that’s stretching it. I plan to tackle the Corbyn phenom sometime soon and try and explain why I mistrust these ‘fan clubs’. WB]

Cinema Strikes spreading across London.

picturehouse-crew
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Omar – Film Review by Gilad Atzmon

6 JUne 2014 — Gilad Atzmon

imagesOne of the most important Palestinian feature films ever, Omar is, to date, the deepest expose of the diabolical nature of the Israeli occupation and the inhuman situation imposed on Palestinians by the Jewish State. It also throws light on the tragic and depressing Palestinian struggle against a sophisticated, demonic enemy – an on-going battle that so far has led nowhere.

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Movie Review: A confused and contradictory film on how foreigners “help” Palestine By Sarah Irving

 
As a child, Chloe Ruthven declares in the opening moments of this film, she hated the Palestinians. It’s a strong statement to make, especially against a backdrop of newsreel from the Nakba, the ethnic cleansing ahead of Israel’s establishment. Continue reading

“The struggle to tell the truth through stories”: An interview with British film and television producer Tony Garnett—Part 2

24 October 2013 — WSWS

Part 1 Here

In a retrospective this summer, “Seeing Red,” the British Film Institute celebrated the work of veteran film and television producer Tony Garnett. The BFI described Garnett as one of television’s “most influential figures,” who “produced and fostered a succession of provocative, radical and sometimes incendiary dramas.”

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“The struggle to tell the truth through stories”: An interview with British film and television producer Tony Garnett—Part 1

23 October 2013 — WSWS

Part 2 Here

In a retrospective this summer, “Seeing Red,” the British Film Institute (BFI) celebrated the work of veteran film and television producer Tony Garnett. The BFI described Garnett as one of television’s “most influential figures,” who “produced and fostered a succession of provocative, radical and sometimes incendiary dramas.” Continue reading

Why bad movies keep coming out and what to do about it By John Pilger

17 October 2013 — John Pilger

As an inveterate film fan, I turn to the listings every week and try not to lose hope. I search the guff that often passes for previews, and I queue for a ticket with that flicker of excitement reminiscent of matinees in art deco splendour. Once inside, lights down, beer in hand, hope recedes as the minutes pass. How many times have I done a runner? There is a cinema I go to that refunds your money if you’re out the door within 20 minutes of the opening titles. The people there have knowing looks. My personal best is less than five minutes of the awful Moulin Rouge. 

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The Art of Collaborating with the Nazi’s: Hollywood & America Reek of Nazi Influence

6 September 2013 — Boiling Frogs

Hitler’s Propaganda Principles Alive in 21st Century

 

The studio heads, who were mostly immigrant Jews, went to dramatic lengths to hold on to their investment in Germany. Although few remarked on it at the time these men followed the instructions of the German consulate in Los Angeles, abandoning or changing a whole series of pictures that would have exposed the brutality of the Nazi regime….At the center of the collaboration was Hitler himself. Continue reading

Movie Review: “We Steal Secrets”: A Masterclass in Propaganda. The Assassination of Julian Assange By Jonathan Cook

30 July 2013 — Jonathan Cook

I have just watched We Steal Secrets, Alex Gibney’s documentary about Wikileaks and Julian Assange. One useful thing I learnt is the difference between a hatchet job and character assassination. Gibney is too clever for a hatchet job, and his propaganda is all the more effective for it.

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