The Police Can Only Become More Racist, Unless They Are Abolished

7 October 2020 — Novara Media

Cat Sims

by Becka Hudson @becka_sh

The British public imagination remains replete with nightmares about racialised crime. This year, there are statue desecrators. In the 1980s, there were muggers. There is always the figure of the thug. The illegal immigrant. The terrorist. More recently, over the past decade, there have emerged particularly frightening types of gang: drill music-producing gangs escalating knife crime within inner cities and running ‘county lines’ of child drug dealers outside of them; and the ‘Asian grooming gang’, networks of Muslim south Asian men engaged in child sexual exploitation who target white girls.

Continue reading

The truth behind Netanyahu’s admission that police killing was a cover-up

14 September 2020 — Jonathan Cook

Apology over portrayal of Bedouin citizen as a terrorist in 2017 incident does not just expose police crimes, it deepens the deception

Middle East Eye – 14 September 2020

It is unprecedented. Three years after the Israeli government first began vilifying a Palestinian teacher to retrospectively justify his murder by Israel’s security forces, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued a public apology to his family last week. Yacoub Abu al-Qiyan was not a “terrorist” after all, the Israeli prime minister conceded.

Continue reading

‘I’m from St Raphael’s estate’: an interview with George the Poet

10 July 2020 — Institute of Race Relations

Written by Jessica Perera

IRR’s Jessica Perera continues her examination of the human cost of estate regeneration by talking about pride and potential with a north-west London poet.

George Mpanga is a London-born spoken-word poet and host of the award-winning ‘Have you heard George’s Podcast?’ If you have not yet discovered the podcast, you might be more familiar with its accompanying advertising posters: ‘it’s hard to listen when you’ve never been heard’ that are dotted across the capital. Concerned that his community on the housing estate he grew up on, St Raphael’s in the north-west London borough of Brent, would not be heard during the current regeneration consultation, George recorded a poem explaining the fears the community had regarding the redevelopment plans.

Continue reading

The School That Tried to End Racism: A cruel experiment in furtherance of identity politics

10 July 2020 — WSWS

By Margot Miller

Channel 4’s two-part documentary, The School That Tried to End Racism, centres on events during the filming of a group of Year 7 (eleven- and twelve-year-old) pupils over three weeks in April last year.

The pupils were subjected to a cruel experiment, but this was positively described by the programme’s narrator as a “ground-breaking initiative” concerning racial bias.

Continue reading

Protest, Riot, Loot, and Burn for Black Freedom in America?

21 June 2020 — American Herald Tribune

Our Current Dilemmas Go Much Deeper Than Racism

World Columbian Exposition 4a311

In Russia Today, Helen Buyniski reflects on corporate responses to the depiction of Black people in brand labeling. Buyniski highlights the comments of B and G Foods as it jumped onto the bandwagon of corporate virtue signalling. The company signalled its intentions to “proactively take steps to ensure that we and our brands do not inadvertently contribute to systemic racism.” The company informs consumers that B and G Foods “unequivocally stand against prejudice and injustice of any kind.”

Continue reading

Would ‘Defund the Police’ Work in the UK?

13 June 2020 — Novara Media

‘Defund the police’ has emerged as a central demand amid a spectacular eruption of collective action against lethal police violence in the United States. As UK Black Lives Matter activists take inspiration, questions are being asked about how this demand – forged in the long history of the US prison abolition movement – can gain purchase in Britain.

Continue reading

Webinar: Walls Must Fall: Ending the deadly politics of border militarisation (TNI)

12 June 2020 — Statewatch

COVID-19 has become another touchstone for today’s deeply entrenched politics of militarised borders and anti-migrant racism. Leaders like Trump and Orban have blamed the virus on foreigners and to claim justification for their racist politics. But they have also been used European Union Member States of all political tendencies have used the crisis to close off ports to rescue ships, making the Mediterranean even more deadly for refugees. The ‘necropolitics’ of border militarization that justifies systemic crimes against humanity has become tragically hegemonic.

Continue reading