Assange’s Extradition Trial: Court Hears About History Of Political Prosecutions Under Espionage Act

17 September 2020 — The Dissenter

“I never thought based on history we’d see an indictment that looked like this,” attorney Carey Shenkman testified.

President Woodrow Wilson used the Espionage Act to repress opposition to World War I. (Photo: Library of Congress)

“There has never, in the century-long history of the Espionage Act, been an indictment of a U.S. publisher under the law for the publication of secrets,” declared Carey Shenkman, an attorney who has co-authored a first-of-its-kind peer-reviewed book on the Espionage Act.

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Media analysis of Julian Assange’s superseding indictment

5 June 2019 — Defend Wikileaks

The precedent

Glenn Greenwald: The indictment of Assange is a blueprint for making journalists into felons

The argument offered by both the Trump administration and by some members of the self-styled “resistance” to Trump is, ironically, the same: that Assange isn’t a journalist at all and thus deserves no free press protections. But this claim overlooks the indictment’s real danger and, worse, displays a wholesale ignorance of the First Amendment. Press freedoms belong to everyone, not to a select, privileged group of citizens called “journalists.” Empowering prosecutors to decide who does or doesn’t deserve press protections would restrict “freedom of the press” to a small, cloistered priesthood of privileged citizens designated by the government as “journalists.” The First Amendment was written to avoid precisely that danger.

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The Accelerating Assault on Journalism

27 August 2013 — FAIR Blog

Some media figures applaud the criminalization of investigative reporting

U.S. soldier Chelsea (formerly Bradley) Manning’s 35-year sentence represents the harshest punishment issued to date for providing media with evidence of government wrongdoing (Forbes8/21/13). She is the first whistleblower to be convicted under the Espionage Act, ratifying the new reality that those who give the press information that the government wants to keep secret will henceforth be treated as spies.

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Defense begins case in trial of Bradley Manning By Thomas Gaist

10 July 2013 — WSWS

Private First Class Bradley Manning’s trial, at Fort Meade, Maryland, is now is in its sixth week. The defense began its case this week, but it has been hamstrung in advance by military judge Colonel Denise Lind’s ruling that Manning’s political motives were irrelevant to case, which effectively denies the defendant any ability to mount a whistleblower defense.

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Rise Up or Die By Chris Hedges

19 May 2013 — Truthdig

Joe Sacco and I spent two years reporting from the poorest pockets of the United States for our book “Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt.” We went into our nation’s impoverished “sacrifice zones”—the first areas forced to kneel before the dictates of the marketplace—to show what happens when unfettered corporate capitalism and ceaseless economic expansion no longer have external impediments. We wanted to illustrate what unrestrained corporate exploitation does to families, communities and the natural world. Continue reading

“Covert Justice” for Bradley Manning: Prosecution Witnesses to Testify Anonymously By Naomi Spencer

12 April 2013 — World Socialist Web Site

During a pre-trial hearing for Army private Bradley Manning Wednesday, a military judge ruled that government prosecutors can call witnesses to testify anonymously and in secret against the accused whistleblower. The ruling exposes the case for the frame-up that it is.

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