The Debtor’s War: A Modern Greek Tragedy By Andrew Gavin Marshall

7 November 2013 — Andrew Gavin Marshall

Early on Thursday, 7 November 2013, Greek riot police stormed the offices of Greece’s main public broadcaster, which had been under a five-month occupation by workers who opposed the government’s decision to shut down the broadcaster, firing thousands and destroying a major cultural institution. The broadcast seems to have come to an end.

Repeal Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act!

14 October 2013 — Liberty

At Liberty we’ve long argued that Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 is ripe for misuse and discrimination.

The power allows for people to be detained for nine hours, fingerprinted, strip searched and asked questions without a right of access to a lawyer. It can be exercised without the need for any grounds to suspect the person is involved in terrorism, or any other criminal activity. This means it can be used against anyone a police, immigration or customs officer chooses and has been used disproportionately against those of Asian origin.

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BBC welfare reform show breached impartiality guidelines

30 July 2013 — BBC

The Trust’s editorial standards committee said that while there was no evidence that Humphrys advocated the coalition government’s reforms, viewers were likely to have formed the impression that there was a “healthy supply of jobs overall” in the UK economy because no information was given on the ratio of jobs to applicants.

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Rise Up or Die By Chris Hedges

19 May 2013 — Truthdig

Joe Sacco and I spent two years reporting from the poorest pockets of the United States for our book “Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt.” We went into our nation’s impoverished “sacrifice zones”—the first areas forced to kneel before the dictates of the marketplace—to show what happens when unfettered corporate capitalism and ceaseless economic expansion no longer have external impediments. We wanted to illustrate what unrestrained corporate exploitation does to families, communities and the natural world. Continue reading

Photo Essay: Profit and Violence in the Name of Comprehensive Immigration Reform By Todd Miller

17 April 2013 — NACLA Border Wars

On April 16, the U.S. Senate’s so-called “Gang of 8” released their 844-page plan for comprehensive immigration reform entitled the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. The border policing aspect of the bill (among many other things) envisions $3 billion for more surveillance systems, including unmanned aerial drones, $1.5 billion for more barriers on the boundary, and the addition of 3,500 more Customs and Border Protection agents (CBP includes the U.S. Border Patrol). This would be on top of the $18 billion (figure from 2012) that the U.S. government already spends on border and immigration enforcement per year, an expense that is more than all other federal law enforcement agencies combined.

Video: South Africa: The Big Debate – Episode 1 – Land

17 February 2013 — YouTube

Interesting insights into the current situation in South Africa in this, the first edition of this ongoing programme. This from the SABC site:

The recent farmworkers’ strike in the Western Cape has highlighted low pay and unbearable working conditions as the main causes of the workers’ grievances. However, some farmworkers have also revealed that land reform and redistribution are at the centre of their concerns.

Former Farmworker in De Doorns, in the Western Cape Petrus Brink says the people are fed up with government’s slow progress in returning the land to them. 2013, marks the 100th anniversary of the 1913 Land Act, which was passed due to pressure from the white population to keep black people from invading white areas. 

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What If They Held A Constitutional Convention and Everybody Came? By Dan Hind

1 April 2013 Return of the Public

On March 25th the House of Commons’ Political and Constitutional Reform Committee published Do We Need A Constitutional Convention for the UK? Though the report acknowledged widespread opposition to the idea – from the government, from the Scottish National Party and from the Conservative party in Wales, as well as from some members of the committee itself – it concluded that a convention was necessary, in order to address the growing strains on the UK‘s constitution caused by ‘a huge amount of incremental constitutional change over the past two decades’ (p.17).

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