NPR Shreds Ethics Handbook to Normalize Regime Change in Venezuela

5 August 2019 — FAIR

FAIR

The Reagan administration in 1982 coerced National Public Radio (NPR) to cover more favorably the US terrorist war then being waged against Nicaragua.

As Greg Grandin writes, Otto Reich, head of the administration’s Orwellian propaganda outfit known as the Office of Public Diplomacy, informed the public network that his office had contracted “a special consultant service [to listen] to all NPR programs” on Central America. Dependent on state funding, NPR promptly buckled under pressure, reassigning reporters viewed as “too easy on the Sandinistas,” and hiring conservative pundit Linda Chavez to provide “balance.”

Continue reading

Media: Declining to Label Lies, NPR Picks Diplomacy Over Reality

6 May 2017 — FAIR

After much back and forth, National Public Radio finally clarified its editorial stance on when it is and isn’t appropriate to call a lie a lie. Wrote NPR’s Richard Gonzales (1/25/16):

Now many listeners want to know why [NPR correspondent Mary Louise] Kelly didn’t just call the president a liar.

On Morning Edition, Kelly explains why. She says she went to the Oxford English Dictionary seeking the definition of “lie.”

“A false statement made with intent to deceive,” Kelly says. “Intent being the key word there. Without the ability to peer into Donald Trump’s head, I can’t tell you what his intent was. I can tell you what he said and how that squares, or doesn’t, with facts.”

Continue reading

Media Advisory: Media and the Keystone March

19 February 2013 — FAIR Blog

Little coverage of large climate action

Tens of thousands of climate activists marched in Washington D.C.on February 17. Did the corporate media notice them?

The main focus for the activists was the White House’s pending decision on the Keystone pipeline, a project that would deliver tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to U.S. refineries on the Gulf of Mexico. The activists argue that the carbon-intensive project would only exacerbate the climate crisis, helping to extract and burn some 170 billion barrels of oil, not to mention threatening other environmental catastrophes in Canada and the United States. 

Continue reading

Turning Their Back on Bradley Manning

4 December 2012 — FAIR

 Whistleblower speaks–but press doesn’t listen

As the alleged source of many of the most vital WikiLeaks reports of the past several years, U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning shed considerable light on how the United States has prosecuted the Iraq and Afghan wars. Other State Department cables reportedly leaked by Manning conveyed vital information about U.S. foreign policy.

Continue reading

FAIR: When Is a Mandate Not a Mandate?

9 November 2012 — Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting

Different standards for different elections–and parties

When it comes to explaining election results, there’s no precise way to determine whether voters gave the winner a “mandate”–defined by Oxford as “the authority to carry out a policy, regarded as given by the electorate to a party or candidate that wins an election.” That makes it interesting to see how media use the expression–and which presidents they think earned one. Continue reading

Bradley Manning Newslinks 13-14 March 2012: Manning Treatment “Cruel, Inhuman” Torture Chief Admits

14 March 2012williambowles.info

 

012

UN official critical of Manning detention

CNN (blog)

US Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, accused of aiding the enemy by passing reams of classified military documents to WikiLeaks, may have been treated inhumanely by the US military since his arrest in 2010, according to a report from the United Nations’ top …

http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/03/13/u-n-official-critical-of-manning-detention/

Continue reading

FAIR Media Advisory: Occupy the P.U.-litzers!

27 December 2011 — Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting

This year has given us simply too many worthy contenders for FAIR’s annual P.U.-litzers—recognizing the stinkiest journalism of the year. A big part of the problem was that so many outlets were striving to distinguish themselves with especially awful coverage of the Occupy Wall Street movement. So to note those lowlights, we bring you a special installment of P.U.-litzers: The OWS edition.

Continue reading

Bradley Manning Newslinks 17 December 2011

17 December 2011 — williambowles.info

Bradley Manning hearing: defence lawyer turns fire on military accusers
The Guardian
Eighteen months after his arrest in Iraq for allegedly orchestrating the largest leak of state secrets in American history, Bradley Manning has faced his military accusers for the first time, immediately turning the guns against them. …
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/16/bradley-manning-hearing-defence-lawyer?newsfeed=true

Continue reading

Smell Something Rotten? 2010 P.U.-litzer Prizes recognize the worst of U.S. journalism

30 December, 2010 — FAIR

At the end of every year FAIR rounds up some of the stinkiest examples of corporate media malfeasance. This year brought no shortage of contenders; indeed, the hardest part of the P.U.-litzers is narrowing down the list.

Readers who think we missed one can share their nominations at the FAIR Blog (fair.org/blog).

And without further ado….

Continue reading

Media Lens: The BBC, Impartiality, And The Hidden Logic Of Massacre — Part 1

4 February, 2009

MEDIA LENS: Correcting for the distorted vision of the corporate media

Writing in the Independent last week, Robert Fisk commented on the BBC‘s refusal to broadcast an appeal for Gaza by the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC):

“The BBC’s refusal to handle an advertisement for Palestinian aid was highly instructive. It was the BBC’s ‘impartiality’ that might be called into question. In other words, the protection of an institution was more important than the lives of children.”
(www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/fisk/robert-fiskrsquos-world-when-did-we-stop-caring-about-civilian-deaths-during-wartime-1521708.html)

Continue reading