Only the Struggle of the People Will Free the Country: The Thirty-Fifth Newsletter (2020)

27 August 2020 — Tricontinental

Amadou Sanogo Mali Sans Tete 2016 2Amadou Sanogo (Mali), Sans-Tete (2016).

Dear friends,

Greetings from the desk of the Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research.

On 18 August, soldiers from the Kati barracks outside Bamako (Mali) left their posts, arrested president Ibrahim Boubacar Këita (IBK) and prime minister Boubou Cissé, and set up the National Committee for the Salvation of the People (CNSP). In effect, these soldiers conducted a coup d’état. This is the third coup in Mali, after the military coups of 1968 and 2012. The colonels who conducted the coup – Malick Diaw, Ismaël Wagué, Assimi Goïta, Sadio Camara, and Modibo Koné – have said that they will relinquish power as soon as Mali has been able to organise a credible election. These are men who have worked closely with military forces from France to Russia, and unlike the coup leaders of 2012 – headed by Captain Amadou Sanogo – they are sophisticated diplomats; they have already demonstrated their skill in manoeuvring the media.

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Mastermind of The Bamako Terror Attack Mokhtar Belmokhtar: A CIA Sponsored “Intelligence Asset”? By Prof Michel Chossudovsky

22 November 2015 — Global Research

Mastermind of The Bamako Terror Attack Mokhtar Belmokhtar: A CIA Sponsored “Intelligence Asset”? By Prof Michel Chossudovsky 

Mali-Hotel-394756

In response to the tragic Paris events of November 13, Central Intelligence Agency director  John Brennan  warned that “ISIL is planning additional attacks… It is clear to me that ISIL has an external agenda, that they are determined to carry out these types of attacks.” (Quoted in Daily Telegraph, November 16, 2015)

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'Humanitarian Warfare': 'Stabilizing' Central Africa for the Multinationals By Burkely Hermann

13 January 2014 — Global Research

On December 5th, yet another war led by foreign powers broke out in Africa, and like the one in Mali, it was led at the helm by the French. The UN Security Council unanimously passed a resolution which authorized the deployment of French and African troops in the Central African Republic. At the same time, Chad, Cameroon, South Africa, Angola, Morocco, Burundi, Rwanda, the Republic of Congo, and other African countries, sent troops. Other countries like the UK, Germany, Spain, Denmark and Poland provided logistical support, while Belgium and the US provided air support by transporting the peacekeeping troops.

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‘Humanitarian Warfare’: ‘Stabilizing’ Central Africa for the Multinationals By Burkely Hermann

13 January 2014 — Global Research

On December 5th, yet another war led by foreign powers broke out in Africa, and like the one in Mali, it was led at the helm by the French. The UN Security Council unanimously passed a resolution which authorized the deployment of French and African troops in the Central African Republic. At the same time, Chad, Cameroon, South Africa, Angola, Morocco, Burundi, Rwanda, the Republic of Congo, and other African countries, sent troops. Other countries like the UK, Germany, Spain, Denmark and Poland provided logistical support, while Belgium and the US provided air support by transporting the peacekeeping troops.

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As War Lingers in Mali, Western Powers Target its Natural Resources By Timothy Alexander Guzman

7 January 2014 — Silent Crow News

France’s intervention in the West African nation of Mali under Operation Serval drove Islamic groups associated with Al-Qaeda out of Northern Mali in February 2013. When the Tuareg rebellion occurred in early 2012, it was against the Malian government led by the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) for the independence of Northern Mali also known as Azawad.

The Destabilization of Africa. A Machiavellian Intrigue of Colossal Proportions By Carla Stea

1 January 2014– Global Research

africa

On December 24th 2013, the United Nations Security Council voted to increase peacekeeping forces in South Sudan, whose independence from the North US-NATO powers celebrated only recently.  Democratic elections in South Sudan did not, however, lead to peace and stability.  Continue reading

Black Agenda Report 25 April 2013: op 10 Things We'll Have After Obama, Everyday Terror

25 April 2013 — Black Agenda Report

This week in Black Agenda Report

by BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

When Barack Obama leaves the White House in January 2017, what will black America, his earliest and most consistent supporters, have to show for making his political career possible. We’ll have the T-shirts and buttons and posters, the souvenirs. That will be the good news. The bad news is what else we’ll have…. and not. Continue reading

French army suppresses reporting of Mali war By Ernst Wolff

13 March 2013WSWS

The war in Mali will enter its third month this week. Some 4,000 French soldiers, and about twice as many African soldiers of an international force fighting in coordination with them, have conquered all the major cities in northern Mali. However, there are hardly any reports of the fighting, and almost no pictures.

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No Sign of Peace or Reconciliation in France-Controlled Mali By Roger Annis

6 March 2013 — The Bullet • Socialist Project • E-Bulletin No. 776

France perpetrated two large deceptions in conducting its military intervention into Mali more than seven weeks ago. These have been universally accepted in mainstream media reporting. The first is that the unilateral decision to invade Mali on January 11, 2013 was hastily made, prompted by imminent military threats by Islamic fundamentalist forces against the south of the country where the large majority of Malians live.

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New at Strategic Culture Foundation 24 February – 2 March 2013: Empires / Kosovo / Iraq / Cuba / Niger-Uranium / Bulgaria

2 March 2013Strategic Culture Foundation

Kerry Brings Image of Dapper Diplomacy to Ugly Face of Washington’s Imperialism
02.03.2013 | 00:00 | Finian CUNNINGHAM

Any illusions about a possible change in direction for American foreign policy were blown away this week with Kerry’s visit to Europe. And it was Kerry himself who blew away such illusions with his own words. The US secretary of state may have sounded multi-lingual and looked urbane in his pinstripe suit, with all its hints of diplomacy, but what he had to say on the issues of Iran and Syria, and by extension Russia, revealed Kerry to be a consistent operator of the same openly militarist agenda that has become such a hallmark of post-9/11 Washington…

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