NEW ASBO LAWS POSE GRAVE THREAT TO PUBLIC FREEDOM

30 June 2013 — Banned in London

The Manifesto Club’s Banned in London map showed the worrying extent of public space regulation, with hundreds of banned zones within which ordinary rights are suspended.

The new anti-social behaviour legislation announced in the Queen’s speech makes all this look very mild. Every draconian power has been replaced with something far worse.

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Reshaping Fiscal Policies In Europe: Enforcing Austerity, Attacking Democracy By Hugo Radice

13 February 2013The Bullet • Socialist Project • E-Bulletin No. 772

On December 9th 2011 the European Council announced a new Fiscal Compact, as part of the series of measures undertaken in order to resolve the Eurozone sovereign debt and banking crises. It was incorporated into the Treaty on Stability, Coordination and Governance (TSCG), signed by 25 <strong class=’StrictlyAutoTagBold’>EU governments in March 2012, subsequently ratified by the signatory national governments, and in force from January 2013.[1] The Compact includes a commitment by those governments to a cap of 0.5% on the ‘structural deficit’ implied by their annual revenue and expenditure plans. It also reinforces the existing Maastricht Treaty fiscal rules through an obligatory adjustment procedure, to be enforced by the European Court of Justice. Continue reading

Statewatch News Online, 10 December 2012 (21/12)

012 — http://www.statewatch.org/ e-mail: office@statewatch.org

1.    EU Council of the European Union: COSI Operational plan & Schengen borders re-introduction
2,    EU: Justice and Home Affairs Council, 6-7 December 2012, Brussels: Final Press release, 6-7 December
3.    EU: Institute of Race Relations: Which way forward on racial profiling?
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Why Carney’s Appointment as Bank of England Governor Should be Challenged By Hugo Radice

5 December 2012 — The Bullet • Socialist Project • E-Bulletin No. 739

The appointment of Mark Carney as next Governor of the Bank of England has been greeted with universal acclaim. In the House of Commons Ed Balls was quick to congratulate Chancellor George Osborne on his choice, and on the evening TV news both former Chancellor Alistair Darling and self-styled monetary maverick David Blanchflower were of the same opinion. Here was a giant of financial regulation, with a PhD in economics, ten years at Goldman Sachs, singlehandedly responsible for guiding Canada to the quickest post-2008 recovery among the G7 countries, and appointed in 2008 to chair the Financial Stability Board set up by the G20. So what’s not to like?

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Building a New World and Tearing it Down: British Working Class Housing Since 1900 By Andrew McCormack

 29 November 2012 — New Left Project

The right to an adequate home is well recognised as essential for participation in any human society[1] and the requirements of adequacy in contemporary industrialized societies are fairly uncontroversial. Yet, whilst thousands of new luxury houses are built for the rich every year, many in Britain remain trapped in conditions reminiscent of the Depression era. 48,000 households became homeless during 2011, with 655,000 families (and rising) battling cramped and overcrowded homes. Continue reading

Leveson and Leviathan, or What the Papers Won’t Say By Dan Hind

29 November 2012 — Return of the Public

Journalists and their editors have an unusual privilege. As brokers of public speech they largely determine how the world beyond our immediate experience appears to us. They decide what matters and who to take seriously. This privilege is particularly pronounced when it comes to their own trade, where, after all, they have firsthand knowledge. And they do not like to let outsiders in on the process, if they can help it. The anthropologist Georgina Born describes in her book Uncertain Vision a 1997 conversation with Jim Gray and Jeremy Paxman of Newsnight: Continue reading

Leveson and Leviathan, or What the Papers Won’t Say By Dan Hind

29 November 2012 — Return of the Public

Journalists and their editors have an unusual privilege. As brokers of public speech they largely determine how the world beyond our immediate experience appears to us. They decide what matters and who to take seriously. This privilege is particularly pronounced when it comes to their own trade, where, after all, they have firsthand knowledge. And they do not like to let outsiders in on the process, if they can help it. The anthropologist Georgina Born describes in her book Uncertain Vision a 1997 conversation with Jim Gray and Jeremy Paxman of Newsnight: Continue reading

The Long and the Short of Press Regulation By Dan Hind

26 November 2012Return of the Public

Free expression is important. Its importance is often couched in terms of the common good. A society in which people can speak freely is one in which injustice can be remedied, corruption punished and so on. But it is also a good for the individual. Free speech is best means by which we  can discover our preferences, strengthen ourselves in argument, and make sense of the world we are thrown into at birth.

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Media Lens: Bad Pharma, Bad Journalism By David Cromwell

23 October, 2012 — Media Lens

Ben Goldacre is a medical doctor and science writer who, until November 2011, wrote the Guardian’s Bad Science column which was presented as a thorn in the side of pseudoscience, quackery and ‘Big Pharma’, the giant and powerful pharmaceutical industry. On September 21, the Guardian published an extract, ‘The drugs don’t work: a modern medical scandal’, from Goldacre’s new book, Bad Pharma. (Unfortunately no longer available on the Guardian website. However, it can currently be accessed here). A disturbing picture emerges of corporate drug abuse: Continue reading